PETER WORTIllNGTON

 

b.1514 d.1578

 

m.

 

Isabel Anderton

 

Extensive information can be found under Peter Worden I, who married Isabel Worthington, daughter of Peter and Isabel (Anderton) Worthington.

 

From Worden's Past family association newsletter, Vol. XIII, No.2, fAug 19921. "More Worden Origins," George L. Bolton, Part III:

 

(Article refers only to grandchildren born before Peter I's death in 1639 and born in Old England. Children born to Peter II after the death of his father are not included.)

 

In the late 16th and early 17th centuries, Lancashire was the county most reluctant to adopt the reformed Anglican religion and one where Roman Catholicism lingered. In early 1599 four itinerant preachers were authorized at a salary of £50 per annum each to be called "Queen's Preachers." After Elizabeth I's death, they were called King's Preachers. Stationed at different places in Lancashire, they were not subject to local church and were not supposed to have a church of their own. They all had university degrees. They were treated with hostility.

 

Lancashire was mainly in the Diocese of Chester and the bishop helped to choose these preachers. In the 1620's the Bishop of Chester was John Bridgeman, former Canon of Wig an, a bad judge of character. Hewas a notable pursuer of sinners, which made him unpopular. This trait also made him enemies. Like other bishops, one of his duties was to collect and forward to the king, who from 1625 was Charles I, the money received in fines from recusants (Roman Catholics). In 1632 he was accused of failing to do this properly and the issue, before the High Commission, became clouded by wild accusations, palpably unlikely, against his character.

 

He retaliated by cataloging the alleged character defects of the witnesses against him and ultimately he was cleared of the charges. This case is interesting for the judicial procedures of the time. The principal witnesses against him were three Kings Preachers, all of whom he had appointed and one of whom was John Lewis. It is clear that all three (the other two were James Martin and Bartholomew Cade) had become thorough villains, even allowing for the wild accusations and counter-accusations of the adversarial court action.

 

John Lewis, who is oddly connected to the Wordens of the time, was the son of Thomas Lewis and was baptized 10Ju11597 at St. Mary Woolnoth, City of London. He entered Sydney Sussex College, Cambridge University, as a sizar (part fee-paying) in 1614, Bachelor of Arts 1617 -18, Master of Arts, 1621. He was ordained Deacon on 20Septl618 and on the next day, the 21st, he marriedJudith Spenser at All-Hallows-on­the-Wall, only 400 yards from his baptismal church. He was ordained a priest in Decl618.

 

On 2Ju11620 he was acting as curate at St. Albans near London when Bishop Bridgeman heard him preach and was so impressed that he carried him off to Wigan, Lancashire. Lewis was appointed Master of Wigan Grammar School with extra salary for preaching sermons. He was appointed King's Preacher sometime before 1623.

 


He brought his wife with him as their daughter, Susan, was baptized at Wigan 2Ju11621. About this time he moved to Ormskirk nearby and on 17Feb1624, the register shows that his wife Judith was buried in the high chancel, and on the same day his son Benjamin was baptized, a strange conjunction. He is referred to as Mr. John Lewis, Kings Preacher.

 

In 1624 he published a religious treatise dedicated to the Earl of Derby, to whom he claimed to be Chaplain, and only 14 weeks after his wife's death he married Anne Ambrose, daughter of the vicar at Ormskirk ... he was 27 and she 37. She did not survive long as the Ormskirk register shows Anne Lewis, wife of John, Clerk, buried in the church on 15Septl626. Marrying this soon after being widowed was not unusual in those times.

 

For an unknown length of time he had been active in the Preston area, not only in a priestly fashion. At Midsummer Quarter Sessions 1626 held at Ormskirk Court, John Lewis, Clerk (i.e., Holy Orders) was bound over in the sum of £10 to keep the Kings Peace to all men, especially to Hugh Massie, and to appear at the next Quarter Sessions. We do not know if he did.

 

On 300ctl626, less than six weeks after the death of his last wife, he married Anne Moore at Preston. She was well connected with a family pedigree. Her fate is unknown. The names of Vicars of Preston from 1623 to 1626 are unknown and he may have been preaching there, which he was allowed to do, without actually being Vicar except perhaps in his own estimation.

 

Worse was to come. At the April 1628 Quarter Sessions at Ormskirk, one Worthington claimed that "about six years ago" (in 1622), John Lewis, '1ate preacher," had left an infant of his called Elizabeth with Worthington and his wife to be nursed, but was behind with payment for the service to the tune of £4 and "is fledd out of the country (i.e., the county), and no grandparents are known." This means he could not be found locally. It seems possible that this child was an illegitimate one as his wife, Judith, was alive in 1624. The child was recorded in 1628 as "being put on the parish."

 

It isn't surprising that he could not be found, as Bishop Bridgeman's defense alleged he had fled to London and was acting as curate therein 1628 -1631, although debarred from ministry. He was also accused of many other things, including frequently ale houses, blasphemy, gambling, fighting or duelling with rapier, pistol or truncheon, with many men including Hugh Massie. He also was said to have left two children in Wigan, one in Ormskirk and one in Lancashire (?), who were reduced to begging. It was even hinted that one of his wives had not died of natural causes.

 

The most dramatic event for us in this catalog of sins is as follows:

 

"He hath a bastard at Leyland, begot on ELIZABElli WEREDEN."

 

The gender of this child is not stated and the loss of the Leydon Parish Register hampers consideration. The existence of this child is very probably true.

 

Who, then, was Elizabeth Wereden (Worden)? Further evidence came from an unexpected quarter. It was obvious that Bishop Bridgeman had assistance in preparing his own defense against the trumped up charges before a Commission in London. The Bridgeman family papers have survived in the Staffordshire County Record Office, some 70 miles to the south.

 

One of the papers, a letter (SRO D1287/18/2) dated 25Feb1633 from the Vicar of Lancashire, August Wyldbore, Doctor of Divinity, provides the Bishop with a great deal of ammunition for his fight against his accusers. One of his charges against John Lewis reads:

 


"4. His Incontinence with Elizabeth ye daughter of Peter Werden, then a single woman, but not maryed to one Swansye in Kirkham by whom he had a bastard child (still) alive, although being examined thereupon in ye High Commission Court, he utterly foreswore it."

 

A note in the margin records "Adultery with Werdens Daughter by whom he had a bastard." August Wyldbore, D.D. was in a good position to know the facts of such matters, as from 1626 to 1630 he was Victor of Preston. He followed the uncertain period when Martin had been vicar and Lewis had claimed to be.

 

Obviously Elizabeth was the daughter of Peter Worden 1. When the Bishop was stating his case in 1633, Elizabeth was married to Hugh Swansey and Peter almost certainly was back living in Clayton. Is it possible to infer that Elizabeth had left this illegitimate child with her father on her marriage?

 

It is likely that the liaison occurred in the period 1625-1628 when Lewis was in the Preston area, although a married man. He would be 28-31 years old and Elizabeth Worden was 20-23. The possibilities for the meeting of the two persons can only be speculated upon, but Peter Worden, and the London-bom, wild, duel­fighting preacher could well have been acquainted with one another in the town of Preston.

 

It is a matter of regret that the sources do not mention the sex of the child. There is no baptismal entry. It was customary for illegitimate children to take the sumame of the mother, in this case, Worden, although there were exceptions. It was almost unknown for middle classes to have two baptismal, or given, forenames, e.g. John Lewis Worden. This device was used much later in such cases, but this might have been an early example of this device.

 

At the time of Peter's emigration he had two grandchildren living: Robert Swansey aged about seven and a Lewis/W orden child of unknown sex aged about eleven.

 

The scene moves to New England. The Will of Peter I of Yarmouth, New England, dated 1639, makes reference to "John Lewis" and "to my grandchild." It now seems likely that John Lewis of the will could very well have been the child of Peter's daughter Elizabeth and the preacher, John Lewis.

 

Conclusion

It is accepted that the long-standing problem of identification of the John Lewis in old Peter's will has been solved, he would seem to have been a true grandchild of Peter, in 1639 aged about fourteen, old enough to have made the voyage a little earlier and thus, conforming to the limitation of being less than eighteen which can be deduced from the terms of the will, Peter II would be his matemal uncle and thus eminently suitable to be appointed as the boy's guardian.

 

Source. #708, Copyright by George L Bolton, Leyland, England, [Feb 1992]

Antiq. Soc., trans. H.S.Lc., Vol. 132

Axon, E., The King's Preachers in Lancashire, 1599-1845, trans. L and C.

Bridgeman, G.T.O., History of the Church and Manor of Wig an, Chet. Soc. N.S., Vol. 16, [1888]. Earl of Bradford (Weston Park) MSS, SRO - D. 1287/18/2.

Fishwick, H., History of the Parish of Preston, [1900].

International Genealogical Index, Microfiche for London.

Printed Parish Records, Wigan Vol. 4, Ormskirk Vol. 13, Preston Vol. 498, LP.R. Soc. Quantrell, B.W., Lancashire Wills, the King's Will, and the Troubling Bishop Bridgeman, trans. H.S.Lc., Vol. 132.

Quarter Sessions Recogizances, LRO-QSB 1/10/10, WSB 1/38/64.

Venn, J. and J.A., Matriculations and Degrees, University of Cambridge, 1544-1659

 


Victoria County history of Lans, Vol. 7, p. 86.

Visitation of Yorkshire, Moore of Lower Harrop, [1665], Suretees Society, Vol. 31,1834

 

From Worden's Past family association newsletter. Vol. XV. No. 1, rMav 19941. "The Feudal System Versus Peter's Mother." George Bolton:

 

Yet another instance has arisen of the potential that exists for information about the early Wordens being contained in the massive amount of documents in the Public Record Office in London.

 

It has been revealed by perusal of a book by Philip Michael Worthington, hereafter abbreviated to PMW, entitled The Worthington Families of Medieval England, publ. 1985 by Phillimore of Chichester, England... This is a substantial book in which the author gives in carefully researched detail the story of a number of related families by the name of Worthington which originated from a place of that name in Lancashire, England.

 

Readers of my articles (esp. Ref. 1) will recall that Robert Worden, the father of Peter I, married into the family of Worthington of Blainscough and this is one of the branches of the Worthington family which Philip.

Worthington describes in his book. Sure enough, in the chapter on that branch, he indicates Isabel, second daughter of Blainscough, as having married (bef. 1570), Robert Worden of Clayton. It is clear that the author of the book had access to documents in the PRO in London and this has enabled him to discover facts about Isabel that Worden researchers (including myself) were unaware of, more especially for the period of her widowhood after 1580 when Robert Worden died.

 

These facts can be integrated into the Worden history and my present article is an augmented paraphrase of the relevant section of PMV's book to which (I) oooo pay(s) acknowledgement.

 

The period of Robert Worden's life coincided with that in which the English medieval feudal system was increasingly falling into duskiest, superseded by more modem methods oflandholding. By the old system, all land was, in theory at least, owned by the King and let out to major landholders who, in turn, let it out to lesser holders, the process of "sub-infeudation." The occupiers held the land by knight's service, where originally they had to provide a specified number of armed knights for the King's service. Later, the service was commuted to a money payment. Homage (ritual acknowledgement) and many other services were demanded from the holder, only one of which need concern us here.

 

When a tenant died, the Lord to whom he owed homage, seized the land and demanded a fine or relief (a specified money payment) before he restored the land to the tenant's heir. If, however, the heir was under 21 years of age, the lord had right of wardship and marriage over the heir, and during his minority, the lord held the land, extracted the profits and used them to maintain and educate the heir, for whom he could also select a wife. Wardship was a saleable asset and in unscrupulous hands could be an injustice.

 

This was the position in which Isabel, wife of Robert Worden of Clayton, found herself on the 11 th of September 1580 when Robert, her husband, died. She was left with three sons, William, the heir being only 11 years old, James somewhat less and Peter (Peter 1) the youngest, we estimate as being only about four years old. This was a serious matter for Isabel and it was not long before the lord of the manor was demanding his right of wardship over young William.

 

Robert Worden had held land in both Clayton and Leyland (adjacent manors) both of which had divided or multiple lordships, but it so happens that Sir Edmund Huddleston was the lord over both these portions of Clayton and Leyland where Robert held his land. The location of the Clayton land is firmly established as I have described earlier, and I believe but cannot yet prove that the Leyland land was immediately adjacent,

 


just across the Worden brook, forming an ancient enclave.

 

PMW quotes in full a document in the Public Record Office (Ref. 2) where Sir Edmund and his wife, Dorothy, submitted a bill of complaint on 30 January 1583 to the Court of the Duchy of Lancaster Chamber in Westminster London (it may be recalled that Duchy cases had to be fought in London whereas Palatinate cases could be fought in Preston). After reciting the circumstances of the Wordens as described above, the plaintiffs described how they had seized the lands in question as well as the actual "bodie of the said William" claiming wardship thereby. But "certeyne deeds evidences charts and writings" which proved that the lands were held by knight service (see above) had "by casual means" come into the hands ofIsabel Worden (the widow), Richard Worthington (her brother), and a John Bannister (possibly her cousin).

 

Worse still, the three named had removed young William from the hands of the Huddlestons and hidden him, their reason being given that the lands were not held by knight service so the wardship was invalid. The plaintiff prayed that Isabel and the others should be brought to court to answer the charges. I suspect that Sir Edmund had brought a similar action about the lands a year earlier (Ref. 3) but the point is unimportant.

 

A couple of months later, Isabel Worden alone submitted a written answer to Westminster (swom in Leyland) and presented to the court on 20 April 1583, in which she claims that the lands were hold in socage, not knight service. Socage is a non-military tenure where the tenant holds land by submitting himself to the lord for protection in retum for fidelity.

 

It would seem to the present writer that the rights of these conflicting claims are somewhat uncertain. An inquisition Post Mortem on Robert Worden was taken at Leyland on 21 November 1584 (Ref. 4, reproduced in an early Worden's Past, VoL 1, No.3, pg. 11) before a panel of jurors who say that the Clayton lands were held by the Huddlestons but by military service. the LP.M. was probably instigated by the Huddlestons and the decision above may well be the reason that when they repeated their claim later in 1586, they limited it to the Leyland lands alone (seven acres) because they felt more sure of these. Meanwhile, young William was getting older all the time and nearing his majority.

 

It may well be that the reason for the uncertainty about the nature of the tenure of the Worden's Clayton holding lay in its peculiar history. From about 1200 A.D. it had been held in frankalmoign, that is, granted by Gerald de Clayton to the monks of Cockers and Abbey in retum for prayers for his souL For much, if not all of the time the Wordens had been the actual tenants of the land and when, in the early 16th century, the abbey had been dissolved, who is to say that the Wordens did not just sit tight regarding their land as an ancient freehold?

 

Back in 1583, an element almost of farce was taking place. In the same court, Isabel tumed on her confederates and accused them of taking William away from his mother, moving him to Standish, then to Blainscough. I cannot help feeling all this is a smokescreen as also the other accusations of breach of trust and theft of com, amusing though they are, but irrelevant.

 

Finally, Lord and Lady Huddleston pleaded that "they were strangers and lived far away," that the defendants had made unto themselves: "secret leases estaytes and conveyances not known to the plaintiffs" and thus, they were being denied both the profits and the lordship of the lands. The Huddlestons were, in fact, non-resident lords and lived in Sawston, Cambridge, having inherited the Leyland lands by marriage. Rather a sorry come­down for the Lord of the manor to have to pleased to the court in this fashion! As is so often the case, the final verdict is missing. I suspect the claim failed by default and passage of time and the Huddlestons heart may not have been in the matter.

 


It rather looks as if this was a case of "all's well that ends well" and certainly, young William, Peter's elder brother, went on to continue the main line of the Clayton Wordens.

 

When, in 1583, Robert Worthington and John Bannister rebutted Isabel's "allegations" the former man (her brother) made a very highly significant statement to the effect that Robert Worden, in 1575, five years before his death, had devised (conveyed by lease) the Leyland lands in question for a term of years to the said Richard (his brother-in-law).

 

In a further statement in 1587, Worthington elaborates on this. He says that, in 1575, Robert Worden was poor, aged and with little life expectancy and "having dyvers younge children unprovyded fore ... that they should be brought up in some honest sort... and might have some honest portion towards their mariages and preferments." This mention of mariages leads me to think that Peter I had one or more sisters, a not unexpected fact but one which has escaped the records until now.

 

The elaboration mentioned above specifically confirms that the lands in the lease were the seven acres in Leyland and that they were held by an entail. The lessee Richard Worthington, and we must remember that he was uncle to young William and all the other young children, including Peter, was to hold the lands for 21 years and at his discretion, was to use the profits for their education and bringing up and for their preferment in marriage.

 

Female children are not specifically mentioned but clearly, this last remark refers to the subject of dowries. Finally, for reasons which can only be surmised and it mussed be observed that the Worthingtons were a Roman Catholic family, he indicates that the lease has been reassigned to one Lawrence Howlker who is to use the profits for the children's benefit exactly as specified above and that this was, in fact, being done satisfactorily.

 

Not surprisingly, after 400 years have passed, some fine detail of the story is missing, but it is very gratifying that research done on a different family, the Worthingtons, has added something to our knowledge of the Worden family.

 

Source Acknowledgement: Reproduced by kind permission from The Worthingtons of Medieval England, by P.M. Worthington, published in 1985 by Phillimore & Co., Ltd., Chichester, West Sussex, England.

 

References:

1.             G.L. Bolton, "Peter Worden's Mother and Her Family,"Worden's Past, Vol. XI, No.4,p. 723.

2.             PRO, Pleadings Duchy of Lancashire, DI 111251H8, DL 11127/W1, DL 1/1391H4.

3.             Record Commission, Ducatus Lancastriae, Part 4, 24 Eliz (1581-2).

4. PRO. Inquisition Post Mortem. Robert Worden 21 Nov. 1584. Duchy of Lancashire,

Chancery DL 7/14. Transcribed in Court of Wards.

Source #708, George L. Bolton, Leyland, England, Uun 1993].

 

Worden's Past family association newsletter. Vol. XV. No.2. rAug 19941. "More Worden Origins." George L. Bolton:

 

See this issue regarding towns and geography, taxation, and other data surrounding Peter Worden I and the Worthington family.

 


Worden's Past family association newsletter, Vol. XV, No.3, [No v 19941, "More Worden Origins," George L. Bolton:

 

Part 12

The family history of Isabel Worthington, Peter Worden's mother, is well attested; indeed, it is probably the most well documented part of early Worden genealogy. Two of my articles on the \Vordens refer in some detail to Isabel, her origins and such of her activities of which we have any evidence (Refs. 1 and 2).

 

In the first of these two contributions (W.P. page 723) I made the statement that no trace of the Manorial Hall of Blains cough, Isabel's birthplace, now exists. Although technically accurate, the statement is now well worth qualifying, in the interests of recording every fact which it is possible to draw out about the early Wordens.

 

In recent months, I have been reading in detail the excellent book by Philip Worthington on the Worthington families of medieval England (Ref. 3) to which I made extensive reference in Part 11 of "More Worden Origins." (N .B., by a kindness, I now possess my own copy.) On pages 3-4 the author makes a brief reference to the site of the old hall, and this fact, together with my renewed general interest in the Worthington families, prompted me to retum to the site of the former Blainscough Hall. I trust that the information obtained will be of interest to the readers. On revisiting the site, I made arrangements to meet the present owner, Mr. Alan Hargreaves, from whom I received every consideration. Let me say immediately that at Blainscough, there is now no remaining structure that Isabel would recognise as the house where she was bom. However, the archaeological traces remaining are of interest in their own right, even without the Worden connection.

 

To recapitulate, Blainscough is an area of Coppull which, in tum, is part of Standish. Originally, in the hands of a family with the sumame Blainscough, it came in the early 14th century into the hands of a branch of the Worthington Family, who by the normal process of early name formation, became the Worthing tons of Blainscough.

The estate, which was quite extensive, can best be described as a minor manor. Like all such manors, it had its manor house which, although we have now no trace of it, was substantial. I base this statement on the face that in 1666 (i.e., after Isabel's day), it retumed 14 hearths to the Hearth Tax of that year, on a par with Clayton Hall near Peter Worden's birthplace. Like Clayton Hall, the Hall at Blainscough was a moated site, and traces of the moat can still be detected.

 

I reproduce a map of 1894 which gives a flavour of the site as it was at that date (see newsletter, this issue). Moats often date from the 12th-14th centuries and not all moats were defensive. Some were omamental as well as practical, and some even may have been status symbols.

 

Typically, the house was built on a platform of clay soil some 1/4 to 11/2 acres in area (I estimate Blainscough to have been 314 acres) surrounded by banks holding water. There would be a causeway for access and in times of danger, the farm stock would be driven on to the platform for safety.

 

The records show that the Worthingtons had a private oratory (chapel) at Blainscough Hall, receiving a license form the Bishop of Lichfield in 1388 for that purpose. It is stated that this oratory was still in use in Isabel's day and may have been used for private baptisms. It is not clear if it was within the old house or was a separate building. In either case, it does not now remain.

 

Now, there still is a BlainscoughHall inexistence, where Alan Hargreaves lives, but it is not the house where Isabel was bom and with which I feel sure Peter Worden was familiar. The reason is sad but simple.

 


The Worthingtons fell on bad times because of their religious and political views, and indeed, because of these facts, by the early 18th century, they fell into obscurity, having mortgaged and then sold the estate.

 

The new owners did not live in the old moated house, but built anew a little to the southeast of the old site, the square building marked on the sketch (see newsletter) by heavy shading. This present building gives a modem appearance, not (ca. 1920) surprisingly, as it has been almost destroyed by fire twice and only slight archeological traces of the original house (ca. 1740) can be detected. The history for the Worthingtons of Blainscough is packed with interest but it is no part of my brief to retain what has been covered so admirably by Philip Worthington, and I can only recommend any interested reader to consult his book. From this and several other sources, however, I would just like to quote two incidents:

 

The principal character of the family was, without doubt, the leamed priest, Dr. Thomas Worthington, S.]., D.d., B.A. (1549-1622), Isabel's brother and Peter Worden's uncle. Trained on the Continent, his activities in England eamed him banishment from the Kingdom back to France and elsewhere, where he was closely associated with Edmund Campion, the noted]esuit who came to England in 1580 to attempt the conversion of England to the Roman Catholic faith and who, not surprisingly, was actively pursued by the authorities. Daringly, Campion visited Blainscough, a sympathetic house, and legend has it that he only escaped capture by the quick action of a maid who pushed him into a pond, convincing the pursuers that he was merely a 'fooL' A nice story, but to no avail, he was later captured and executed.

 

More of potential significance is the fact (Ref. 4) that Thomas Worthington rose to such eminence that in 1615 in Belgium, when an assembly of Roman dignitaries met to consider a commission from the Pope (Paul V) for the selection of an Archbishop of Canterbury, that is provided the Roman religion was restored in England, the Commission chose Dr. Thomas for the position. Needless to say, this state of affairs did not come about but if it had, I wonder what effect this would have had on the subsequent history of Peter Worden I, his nephew!

 

References:

 

1. 2. 3. 4.

 

  G.L. Bolton. "Peter Worden's Mother and Her Family," W.P. VoL XI, No.4, page 722.

'G.L. Bolton. "The Feudal System vs. Peter's Mother," W.P. VoL XV, No.1, page 1079. P.M. Worthington. "Worthington Families of Medieval England," Phillimore.

Ibid, page 169.

 


IT.

 

ISABEL WORTIllNGTON

M. ca. 1568, Robert Worden, b. 1534, near Clayton, England; d. 1580. He was the son of William Worden, d. @ 1574.

 

1534 Final rift between England and Rome; Elizabeth Barton, the "Nun of Kent," English ecstatic opposed to matrimonial policy of Hemy VIII, is executed at Tyburn; Jesuit Order is founded by Ignatius Loyola; Luther completes the translation of the Bible into German; Michelangelo completes the Medici tomb in Floren<;e and moves to Rome; Jacques Cartier, on his first voyage to North America, sights the coast of Labrador; Decree forbidding English farmers to own more than 2,000 sheep.

 

Children:

1.         William Worden, b. 1569; d. 1665. Married 1) Ellen ( ).

 

Child:

1.         William Worden, b. 1652; d. 1707, living in 1642; m. Jane AshphalL

 

Children:

1.         Henry Worden, b. 1637, d. 1693.

2.         Anne Worden, b. 1663.

3.         Margaret Worden, b. 1653.

 

2. 3.

 

James Worden. Living in 1602 and also had a son living at that time.

Peter Worden I, b. 1576, near Clayton, England; d. Feb 1638, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA; bur. East Dennis, Barnstable; m. 1603-06, Margaret Grice, b. ca. 1566-71; d. 1612.

 


ROBERT WORDEN

 

b.1534 d.1580

 

Isabel Worthington

 

Worden's Past family association newsletter, Vol. XI, No.4, fFeb 19911. "Peter Worden's Mother and Her Family," George L. Bolton:

 

... (the specific genealogy of Peter Worden's mother) has until now been somewhat neglected by researchers

 

Itis well known that his mother's maiden name was Isabel Worthington, the primary source being the 1567 pedigree of the family of Worthington of Blainscough recorded at the Heraldic Visitation of Lancashire by William Flower in 1567 (Ref. 1). It is profitable to examine this pedigree to trace the origins of the names of this Isabel Worthington and her son, Peter Worden, who resulted from her marriage to Robert Worden of Clayton ...

 

Blainscough is a hamlet, part of the village of Coppull, a former coal mining area some five miles south of Leyland on the old London road. It should be clear by now that in earlier times, marriages often were between families drawn from a very small area.

 

The Worthingtons had been settled at the Manorial Hall of Blains cough... since the early 15th century. From 1461 to 1503, we notice that the son and heir of the family was a Peter Worthington. At once, we can say that Peter Worden's forename is thus traceable to at least ca. 1450. Two generations later, another Peter Worthington, grandson of the first (lived 1514-1578) married Isabel, daughter of James Anderton of Eucton (which... is adjacent to the hamlet of Worden).

 

The forename Isabel is one which can be traced it„:fue families of Anderton of Anderton and Anderton of Euxton to a very early period. Peter and Isabel Worthington had four sons and five daughters, the second daughter, also named Isabel, married Robert Worden of Clayton, possibly about 1568, and as we know, their son was our Peter Worden I... the names of Peter I, II and II are of respectable antiquity.

 

... Itmay be noted that, although the name Worthington derives from the name of an Anglo-Saxon tribe, the family took as their heraldic emblem three dung forks, a punning allusion to the old word "worthing," meaning Manure ... a highly valuable commodity.

 

Evidence of the social history or the lifestyle of either the Wordens or the Worthing tons at this period are nonexistent. Some information is available, however, about the religious affiliations of the Worthingtons. When dealing with the 16th and 17th centuries ... it is an error to speak simply of families being Protestant, Roman Catholic, or Dissenter. Religion, at this period, was in a state of flux. Families or individuals could hold different beliefs at different times, or even within the same family. The official religion of England changed frequently and with the slowness of communications, it was difficult to keep up with the changes.

 

For instance, Peter Worden's maternal grandfather, Peter Worthington (1514-1578) lived in four reigns, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary I, and Elizabeth I during which the official religion was subjected to both change and reversal. There is evidence (Ref. 3) that outwardly, at least, he appears to have conformed to the established religion. We do not know what effect this had on his daughter, Isabel, for instance, but we do

 


know that his fourth son, Thomas (1549-1626 and Peter Worden's uncle) was educated at Oxford, trained as a Roman Catholic on the Continent and retumed to England in 1578 as a missionary of that faith, thus incurring his father's opposition. His subsequent history of capture, imprisonment in the Tower of London, exile and retum to England where he died in 1626, are well documented.

 

His nephew, another Thomas (1567-1619), current head of the family (and Peter Worden's cousin), also adhered strongly to the Roman faith. He married a niece of Cardinal Allen and found it advisable to take refuge abroad where he died in 1619. On balance, therefore, it can be said that the Worthingtons of Blainscough were more inclined to the Roman Catholic faith than otherwise ...

 

References

Visitation of Lancashire by William Fowler, [1567]. Chetham Society, Vol. 81 [1870]. G.L Bolton, "Worden Origins," Wardens Past, Vol. VII, No.4, p. 353.

W. Farrer, ed., Victoria County History of Lancashire, Vol. VI, p. 227.

 

Worden's Past family association newsletter, Vol. XV, No. 1, fMay 19941, "The Feudal System Versus Peter's Mother," George Bolton:

 

Yet another instance has arisen of the potential that exists for information about the early Wordens being contained in the massive amount of documents in the Public Record Office in London.

 

It has been revealed by perusal of a book by Philip Michael Worthington, hereafter abbreviated to PMW, entitled The Worthington Families of Medieval England publ. 1985 by Phillimore of Chichester, England... This is a substantial book in which the author gives in carefully researched detail the story of a number of related families by the name of Worthington which originated from a place of that name in Lancashire, England.

 

Readers of my articles (esp. Ref. 1) will recall that Robert Worden, the father of Peter I, married into the family of Worthington of I}lainscough and this is one of the branches of the Worthington family which Philip Worthington describes in his book. Sure enough, in the chapter on that branch, he indicates Isabel, second daughter of Blainscough, as having married (bef.1570), Robert Worden of Clayton. !tis clear that the author of the book had access to documents in the PRO in London and this has enabled him to discover facts about Isabel that Worden researchers (including myself) were unaware of, more especially for the period of her widowhood after 1580 when Robert Worden died.

 

These facts can be integrated into the Worden history and my present article is an augmented paraphrase of the relevant section of PM V's book to which (I)..................................................................... pay(s) acknowledgement.

 

The period of Robert Worden's life coincided with that in which the English medieval feudal system was increasingly falling into duskiest, superseded by more modem methods oflandholding. By the old system, all land was, in theory at least, owned by the King and let out to major landholders who, in tum, let it out to lesser holders, the process of "sub-infeudation." The occupiers held the land by knight's service, where originally they had to provide a specified number of armed knights for the King's service. Later, the service was commuted to a money payment. Homage (ritual acknowledgement) and many other services were demanded from the holder, only one of which need concem us here.

 

When a tenant died, the Lord to whom he owed homage, seized the land and demanded a fine or relief (a specified money payment) before he restored the land to the tenant's heir. If, however, the heir was under 21 years of age, the lord had right of wardship and marriage over the heir, and during his minority, the lord

 


held the land, extracted the profits and used them to maintain and educate the heir, for whom he could also select a wife. Wardship was a saleable asset and in unscrupulous hands could be an injustice.

 

This was the position in which Isabel, wife of Robert Worden of Clayton, found herself on the 11 th of September 1580 when Robert, her husband, died. She was left with three sons, William, the heir being only 11 years old, James somewhat less and Peter (Peter I) the youngest, we estimate as being only about four years old. This was a serious matter for Isabel and it was not long before the lord of the manor was demanding his right of wardship over young William.

 

Robert Worden had held land in both Clayton and Leyland (adjacent manors) both of which had divided or multiple lordships, but it so happens that Sir Edmund Huddleston was the lord over both these portions of Clayton and Leyland where Robert held his land. The location of the Clayton land is firmly established as I have described earlier, and I believe but cannot yet prove that the Leyland land was immediately adjacent, just across the Worden brook, forming an ancient enclave.

 

PMW quotes in full a document in the Public Record Office (Ref. 2) where Sir Edmund and his wife, Dorothy, submitted a bill of complaint on 30 January 1583 to the Court of the Duchy of Lancaster Chamber in Westminster London (it may be recalled that Duchy cases had to be fought in London whereas Palatinate cases could be fought in Preston). After reciting the circumstances of the Wordens as described above, the plaintiffs described how they had seized the lands in question as well as the actual "bodie of the said William" claiming wardship thereby. But "certeyne deeds evidences charts and writings" which proved that the lands were held by knight service (see above) had "by casual means" come into the hands ofIsabel Worden (the widow), Richard Worthington (her brother), and a John Bannister (possibly her cousin).

 

Worse still, the three named had removed young William from the hands of the Huddlestons and hidden him, their reason being given that the lands were not held by knight service so the wardship was invalid. The plaintiff prayed that Isabel and the others should be brought to court to answer the charges. I suspect that Sir Edmund had brought a similar action about the lands a year earlier (Ref. 3) but the point is unimportant.

 

f

A couple of months later, Isabel Worden alone submitted a written answer to Westminster (swom in Leyland) and presented to the court on 20 April 1583, in which she claims that the lands were hold in socage, not knight service. Socage is a non-military tenure where the tenant holds land by submitting himself to the lord for protection in retum for fidelity.

 

It would seem to the present writer that the rights of these conflicting claims are somewhat uncertain. An inquisition Post Mortem on Robert Worden was taken at Leyland on 21 November 1584 (Ref. 4, reproduced in an early Worden's Past, Vol. 1, No.3, pg. 11) before a panel of jurors who say that the Clayton lands were held by the Huddlestons but by military service. the LP.M. was probably instigated by the Huddlestons and the decision above may well be the reason that when they repeated their claim later in 1586, they limited it to the Leyland lands alone (seven acres) because they felt more sure of these. Meanwhile, young William was getting older all the time and nearing his majority.

 

It may well be that the reason for the uncertainty about the nature of the tenure of the Worden's Clayton holding lay in its peculiar history. From about 1200 A.D. it had been held in frankalmoign, that is, granted by Gerald de Clayton to the monks of Cockersand Abbey in retum for prayers for his soul. For much, if not all of the time the Wordens had been the actual tenants of the land and when, in the early 16th century, the abbey had been dissolved, who is to say that the Wordens did not just sit tight regarding their land as an ancient freehold?

 


Back in 1583, an element almost of farce was taking place. In the same court, Isabel tumed on her confederates and accused them of taking William away from his mother, moving him to Standish, then to Blainscough. I cannot help feeling all this is a smokescreen as also the other accusations of breach of trust and theft of com, amusing though they are, but irrelevant.

 

Finally, Lord and Lady Huddleston pleaded that "they were strangers and lived far away," that the defendants had made unto themselves :"secret leases estaytes and conveyances not known to the plaintiffs" and thus, they were being denied both the profits and the lordship of the lands. The Huddlestons were, in fact, non-resident lords and lived in Sawston, Cambridge, having inherited the Leyland lands by marriage. Rather a sorry come­down for the Lord of the manor to have to pleased to the court in this fashion! As is so often the case, the final verdict is missing. I suspect the claim failed by default and passage of time and the Huddlestons heart may not have been in the matter.

 

It rather looks as if this was a case of "all's well that ends well" and certainly, young William, Peter's elder brother, went on to continue the main line of the Clayton Wordens.

 

When, in 1583, Robert Worthington and John Bannister rebutted Isabel's "allegations" the former man (her brother) made a very highly significant statement to the effect that Robert Worden, in 1575, five years before his death, had devised (conveyed by lease) the Leyland lands in question for a term of years to the said Richard (his brother-in-law).

 

In a further statement in 1587, Worthington elaborates on this. He says that, in 1575, Robert Worden was poor, aged and with little life expectancy and "having dyvers younge children unprovyded fore ... that they should be brought up in some honest sort ... and might have some honest portion towards their mariages and preferments." This mention of mariages leads me to think that Peter I had one or more sisters, a not unexpected fact but one which has escaped the records until now.

 

The elaboration mentioned above specifically confirms that the lands in the lease were the seven acres in Leyland and that they were held by an entail. The lessee Richard Worthington, and we must remember that he was uncle to young William and all the other young children, including Peter, was to hold the lands for 21 years and at his discretion, was to use the profits for their education and bringing up and for their preferment in marriage.

 

Female children are not specifically mentioned but clearly, this last remark refers to the subject of dowries. Finally, for reasons which can only be surmised and it mussed be observed that the Worthing tons were a Roman Catholic family, he indicates that the lease has been reassigned to one Lawrence Howlker who is to use the profits for the children's benefit exactly as specified above and that this was, in fact, being done satisfactorily.

 

Not surprisingly, after 400 years have passed, some fine detail of the story is missing, but it is very gratifying that research done on a different family, the Worthingtons, has added something to our knowledge of the Worden family.

 

Source Acknowledgement: Reproduced by kind permission from The Warthingtans of Medieval England, by P.M. Worthington, published in 1985 by Phillimore & Co., Ltd., Chichester, West Sussex, England.

 

References:

1.             G.L Bolton, "Peter Worden's Mother and Her Family,"Warden's Past, Vol. XI, No. 4,p. 723.

 


PRO, Pleadings Duchy of Lancashire, DI 1/1251H8, DL 1/127/W1, DL 1/1391H4.

Record Commission, Ducatus Lancastriae, Part 4,24 Eliz (1581-2).

PRO. Inquisition Post Mortem. Robert Worden 21 Nov. 1584. Duchy of Lancashire, Chancery DL 7/14. Transcribed in Court of Wards.

Source #708, George L Bolton, Leyland, England, Uun 1993].

 

2. 3. 4.

 

Sources

Bolton, George L, Worden's Past family association newsletter, VoL XI, No.4.

 


ImaMAs GRICE

,

 

d.1588

 

m.

 

_--' Alic_/

 

Bolton, George L, "More Worden Origins," Wardens Past family association newsletter, Vol. XIII, No.4:

 

On the 20th of March, 1581, in the 23rd year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth the First, if a visitor had arrived at the Worden farm holding in Clayton, Lancashire, he would most probably have found the three young sons of Robert Worden, namely, William, James and Peter, helping or hindering (for Peter was only about five years old) their mother Isobel Worden, seven months widowed, to run the daily work of the holding. We do not know if the boys had any sisters. Girls are often not mentioned, but one can hope they had. The task cannot have been easy.

 

On that day, 20 miles to the south, Thomas Grice (Grise or Gryce) father of Margaret, the girl whom Peter eventually was to marry, was receiving from Sir Edward Boteler (Butler), hereditary Lord of the Manor of Warrington, his lease of a property in the town of Warrington. This was a very different situation from that of the holding of the Wordens; it was on a main road through a large town; it was a leasehold as distinct from the Wordens, which was an ancient freehold. It was a "lease for lives" and Thomas named his three sons, John, Thomas and Lawrence as the "lives" so that the lease would run whilst any of them were still living. Good tenants were often allowed to substitute further lives in the tenancy, but these three were all younger than 21 at the time.

 

I have shown in an earlier part that Thomas Grice, as well has having a small holding, was a substantial innkeeper. He also, in late 1587, was occupying the position of bailiff to the Botelers, but it is not clear what this entailed. Either, because of sickness or just prudence, he made his will in early 1583, but in fact, lived on until early 1588. It must be an indication of his social standing that two of his daughters married into armigerous families, Elizabeth to John Hawarden ofWidnes, and later, Margaret to Anthony Wall of Preston.

 

The will and accompanying inventory are a happy survival and whilst it would not be appropriate to reduce them here, they shed much light on the contents of a 16th century English inn. I will just mention that he possessed "plate" (solid silver items ... not the silver plate of modern usage) to the value of £16 sterling. The beds I have mentioned earlier!

 

After the death of Thomas, it is clear that the property was taken up by the eldest son, John, and much information survives about his tenancy. In particular, a survey of the Manor in 1593 (Lilford Monuments LRO-DDL1 "Manor of Warrington ... a 19th century transcript") shows that John Grice was holding a messuage and orchard garden with a frontage on to Bridge Street (the main London road leading northwards from the river bridge) 53 feet wide, one of the widest in the street. In addition, he held some 37 acres of meadow pasture and arable in the common fields of Warrington. As we have seen he had both inn and farm.

 

The 1593 survey was carried out during the Lordship of (Sir) Robert Dudley, who as a matter of interest was the son by the second wife (?) of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, the favorite and very nearly the husband of Queen Elizabeth the First. The Dudleys had become Lords of Warrington in 1586, in succession to the Boteliers.

 

Young Dudley, almost as much a character as his father, in early 1597 sold out his interest in the Manor to

 


(Sir) Thomas Ireland. In one of the sale documents (LRO-DDLI 137), the holding is clearly described as "Bridge Street ... one tenement now or late in the occupation of one John Gryce ... commonly called or known by the name of the Signe of the Eagle." So, we now know the name of the inn and its location which is quite exceptional for this early period (the benefits of working on the history of a township!).

 

References show that elsewhere the Eagle has been used as an inn sign since the 15th century. It was also a Roman military emblem and the symbol of St. John the Evangelist. The survey mentioned above shows that John Grice was paying £5-12s. annual rent for his holding, £5- 7s. for his house and land in the common fields and 4 shillings for a 'Draps booth" adjacent to the house. Now, this is interesting. Itis also shown that in the town, there were 29 mercers booths and 13 drapers booths. I take a booth to make a shop of sorts. The fact that Grice was involved in textiles in some way might suggest a connection with the Walls of Preston.

 

Some time after this, John Grice must have died or moved elsewhere, for we find Thomas, the second eldest son, in possession of the holding, and indeed, he died there. The Warrington register (LPRS-70) shows a burial 28 May 1623 ... "Thomas Grice Innkeeper." No will survives but a splendid inventory does and it is interesting to compare this with that of this father, Thomas, in 1588. It is quite clearly the same inn with the same number of rooms and the same number of beds. Even the silver is the same, 72 ounces at 4s.6d. an ounce = £ 16-4s. Very remarkably, all the names of the rooms have been changed from mainly town names to those of animals and birds, the reason cannot now be seen. In the Newe Parlour, there was "a table of Sir Thomas Irelands Armes, three little tables or scatches (escutcheons) of arms and four pictures" valued at 6s.9d., and in the Hall, "a table ofMr. Rixons (Thomas? Rixton) Arms, valued at 12 pence." This genealogy could only have been hanging on the wall since 1597 when Ireland became Lord Thomas Rixton, in his will of 1615, bequeathed to Thomas Gryce "one payre of Sylke garters of russett couller."

 

In all this description of the Warrington inn, we must not forget that it was the home of Margaret Grice, who of course, does not get mentioned, but who brings the connection with our story by marrying firstly, Anthony Wall and then Peter Worden. I t would not seem unreasonable to think that after the latter marriage (or even before), the couple came down to Warrington to visit Margaret's brothers. There were certainly enough beds to cater for them if they stayed overnight, as well they might. Incidentally, on this point, the rules of the manor stated that those who professed to be innkeepers were obliged to receive travelers and the constables had the power to enforce this rule.

 

The Grices, perhaps because of the Wall connection, had an interest in Preston, as in the Guild Rolls for 1622, there is entered a Foreign Burgess "Lawrence Gryce, son of Thomas Gryce of Warrington," but it is not clear which of two generations he is. As will be shown later, the Thomas Grice, Margaret's brother, appears in our story again in some litigation in 1616.

 

... We may note that the ubiquitous Doctor Richard Kuerden, c. 1695, passed through Warrington northwards, and recorded his crossing the Mersey "over a fair stone bridge of four arches and through the Market Gate (i.e., up Bridge Street)." On the self-same journey, he proceeded through Worden hamlet on to Preston. On the one journey, he would thus pass the former birthplaces of both Peter Worden and Margaret Grice, later Peter's wife. Perhaps this helps a little to put the story in context.

 

PostscriPt

By studying old maps and other related documents, it has been possibly to pinpoint the location of the "Eagle" inn, where Margaret, Peter's wife, was born, but unfortunately nothing now remains of the place due to modernization of the town.

 

In his will, he asks "that my nowe dwellings house maie bee kepte by them (widow and son) as an inn, suche

 


in any other way. Either in 1583, he had come on the scene ... as I think likely... or for some other unknown reason. the way in which Anthony Wall of Preston became acquainted with an innkeeper's daughter in Warrington can only, at present, be speculated upon, but the town lies on the main London road from Preston, some 30 miles to the south of the latter.

 


11IE WALL FAMILY (including Anthony, husband of Margaret who married Peter Worden)

 

From Bolton's article, below:

 

... Whilst not contributing to the genetic constitution of the Wordens, (the Walls of Preston) are an extremely interesting family in their own right and one with which Peter Worden had of necessity, but perhaps not of choice, much contact and also they are illustrative of the period and circles in which Peter was involved.

 

The Walls first appear in the same Guild Rolls of 1542 as Peter's father and grandfather make their own appearance, but there is an essential difference, which is illustrative of Guild procedure. The Walls appear as In,Burgesses, simply because they had come to live in the town of Preston (from Burscough) whereas the Wordens continued to live in Clayton and hence were Foreign Burgesses as were their descendants, including the two Peters. By both inheritance and trade, the Walls continued to prosper and to assert their status by application at the Heralds Visitations to the County.

 

The Wall family have been very badly served by the late nineteenth century Preston historian who contributed so much to later knowledge of Preston family accounts and who, not to put too a fine a point on the matter, made a complete confusion of the genealogy of the family. Very fortunately for the present purpose, only certain portions are needed and these are clear enough.

 

Whilst the family had more than one property in the town of Preston, it seems that their principle residence was in Fishwick, an area to the south of the town overlooking the river Ribble. It was not long before they had another residence outside the town boundaries, to the north, at a place called Whittingham, which came into their possession in the following way. In the mid 16th century, William Wall, current head of the family married Anne, daughter of John Singleton of Single Hall (altematively known as Chingle Hall) in Whittingham some four miles north of Preston town centre. Now the Singletons were a very old family and their residence at the time was this ancient moated houses, probably dating from the 13th century with its associated manor and manorial windmill. In 1571,J ohn Singleton died and by the premature death of his son, the estate devolved on to his granddaughter, then aged four, who tragically became an idiot and died in 1585.

 

The estate became the subject of much dispute and the principal claimant was Anthony Wall, son of William Wall who, as shown above, had married Anne Singleton, the said William having died in the period before the dispute. Now this Anthony Wall was none other than the first husband of Margaret Wall whom Peter Worden married.

 

Anthony Wall won the day in the dispute and the estate remained in the Wall family until 1764, and the Walls became "of Preston and Chingle Hall" in their pedigree. It seems that it was only shortly before his death in April 160 1 that Anthony Wall had actually come into possession of Chingle Hall, but there seems good reason to suppose that he immediately took up residence there,along with his wife, Margaret, and their children. If this is correct, it is to Chingle Hall that Peter Worden had to go to pay his respects to the Widow Margaret.

 

Now, whether Peter carried off his bride to his own house or whether he "moved in" with her in Chingle Hall is not at all clear, but the important thing to us today is that here, we have a house still standing with which Peter was thoroughly familiar, and I think it will be agreed that this house must have great interest for us all.

 


English translation:

"Isaac Allerton, unmarried man from London, England, accompanied by Edward Southworth & Ralph Dickens his acquaintances, with Mary Norris, single woman of Newbury, England, accompanied by Anne Fuller and Priscilla Carpenter, her acquaintances. Married before William Cornelison Tyboult & Jacob Paedts, sheriffs, November 4,1611." (Sumner)

 

1615

 

Isaac became a citizen of Leydon and later that year he was the guaranty for Degory Priest. These two were the only two Pilgrims who became Dutch citizens.

 

1618

 

Isaac and Mary witnessed the betrothal of Edward Winslow, later governor of Plymouth Colony.

 

1620

 

Having joined with Samuel Fuller, Edward Winslow and William Bradford in a letter to Robert Cushman and John Carver, the first governor of Plymouth Colony, then in England, cautioning them not to go too far without the writers. History shows the Pilgrims paid dearly for Cushman's mismanagement.

 

Allerton left Holland on the Speedwell with his family on board. When the passengers readjusted at Plymouth, England, after the Speedwell, which leaked, was abandoned, the Allertons continued on the Mayflower. They left the baby Sarah behind, but she was later brought by her Aunt Sarah, now married to Cuthburt Cuthbertson. (Sumner)

 

Decl620

 

To New England on the Mayflower with his first wife, who was one of the many who died during the first winter. While on the Mayflower in Province town Harbor, Mary had a baby son, but the baby did not live and, as mentioned, she died within two months.

 

In the assignment of "the seven garden plotes" Allerton drew one next to Francis Cooke.

 

Bef.

25Feb1620-21 Mary Norris Allerton died.

 

1621

 

Governor Carver died, and William Bradford was chosen governor, with Allerton as assistant governor. He held this office until 1625 and perhaps longer.

 

He was at this time a freeman of the colony and was assessed the largest tax in the colony, £3.11. When his sister Sarah's estate was settled, he was the largest creditor at£75, but gave "free leave that the other creditors should be paid first, desiring rather to lose all rather than other men should lose any." (Sumner)

 

"Mary 'died with the first' in Plymouth, MA ... and was buried on Cole's HilL" (Sumner)

 

1623

 

Isaac received an additional seven acres.

 

1625

 

Robert Cushman died and Isaac as repeatedly sent to England beginning this date as the agent of the Plymouth Colony. He and Winslow, after several stormy meetings with the Merchant Adventurers in England, induced them to advance money for supplies which were committed to their custody as "our factours, at whose discretion they are to be sould, and commodities to be taken for them, as is fitting." (Sumner)

 


1626

 

1627

 

1628

 

1627

 

1630

 

Bef. 12Decl634

 

1634

 

1635

 

1936

 

1637

 

It was this bringing over of his own merchandise that incensed Bradford.

 

He went again in 1627 after Standish had failed the year before, returning in the spring of 1627 with the draft of an agreement "drawne by the best counsel oflaw they could get, to make it firme." By the contract the Adventurers sold their entire interest to Plymouth Colony for £1800, £200 to be paid annually. (Sumner)

 

He went to England again and made the first payment on the debt. He brought a great assortment of merchandise back, Bradford claiming that his own goods were more vendable than theirs, and so Allerton sold them outside of the Colony. They sent him to England again, "considering how well he had done the former business, and what goode acceptation he had with their friends there." He then spent 3 months in Holland, arranging for the rest of the Pilgrims to come to New England. 35 families did come, on the ship, Lion. He waited for the reading at the council table of the patents, which had been granted by the King - one a charter for Plymouth, the other a better one for Kennebec than he had obtained on a former trip. The Lion could wait no longer and sailed from Bristol with the last of the Pilgrims, forced to abandon the matter temporarily. (Sumner)

 

In the distribution of cattle of this year, Isaac and his party of thirteen fell "the Greate Black cow that came in the Anne, to which they must keepe the lesser of the steers and two she goats." (Sumner)

 

Isaac spent months in England, without much financial support, but he and the London partners did secure a patent of land on the Penobscot, which provided the opportunity for Plymouth control of trade and fishing on the coast of Maine. With the English partners he bought the white Angel and hired the Friendship, seeing thereby the means of raising money to pay some of their debt, but Bradford was furious at the purchase. They now owed about £5,000. Bradford wrote in 1630, "Mr. Allerton followed his affaires and returned to England, with his White AngelL" Evidently Allerton took the ship over, himself, when the Colonists complained, and when the ship made money, they resented it. He had other clashes with Bradford and Allerton, feeling misused, and feeling his good name was tarnished, withdrew from the Colony. (Sumner)

 

He became a coast trader sometime after 1630.

 

Fear Brewster Allerton died at Plymouth Colony of "pestilent fever."

 

Although the Plymouth Colonists found fault with him, they could not spare him, and in 1634 elected him Assistant, hoping to induce him to return. He had built a house before 1635 at Rocky Nook, near "the Old Wading Place," at Jones' River, the property later belonging to his son-in-law Elder Thomas Cushman. (Sumner)

 

To the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

 

Lived in Boston, MA.

 

"Isaac Allerton, gent." was on the second list of freemen.

 


26Sep1639

 

1643

 

Bef. 1644

 

1644

 

1645

 

1646

 

1647

 

1658

 

Gave a deposition at Plymouth that his age was "about 53 years."

 

He and eight others were elected for conferences during an uprising (Connecticut).

 

M. 3) Joanna Swinneton at Marblehead, MA.

 

The same men elected in 1643 sent a letter to Holland, charging Director Kieft with malfeasance in office and inciting the recent Indian War. They requested his removal (from New Amsterdam, now New York), and Peter Stuyvesant was sent over to replace him. Allerton was a burgher in New Amsterdam and was taxed sixty florins, one of the largest tax payers. The court minutes in New Amsterdam have many references to him. He seems to have been greatly in demand as security or bail, and often acted as Dutch interpreter at court. (Sumner)

 

Allerton and his wife were shipwrecked in a storm but all were saved. (Sumner)

 

A settlement of all London claims for Plymouth was completed and for the first time the Colony enjoyed freedom from debt. Winslow and others tried in vain to get Allerton to adjust his accounts. The probate files at Plymouth County show that many estates were indebted to him.

 

He established headquarters of his fishing fleet of eight boats at Marble Harbor, but his residence there was full of misfortune. His house at Marblehead bumed, and a ship he sent to France was lost with its entire cargo. His earlier connections with Massachusetts Bay Colony were fruitful and he helped the new settlement of Boston very materially. There were later differences, suspected to be the outgrowth of his championship of Roger Williams. (Sumner)

 

Most of his time was at sea or looking after varied interests, and since he was no longer Plymouth's agent, he made the most of his opportunities. The Main records prove his association with Richard Vines and Sir Ferdinando Gorges - who in a deed calls him "rusty and well beloved"

 

He established business relations with new Amsterdam (New York) and New Haven, and had a home in each place. He was prominent, yet little is known of his later years in these places. He could speak Dutch and English as well as several Indian tongues. (Sumner)

 

He was the bearer of important letters passing between Stuyvesant and the govemor of the New Haven Colony. His advice was sought by both.

 

His New Haven house was "a grande house with four porticoes" and was one of the "four which excelled in stateliness all other houses erected by the first generation of its inhabitants." He and Joanna had prominent seats in the New Haven Church under Rev. John Davenport, the seating rigidly appointed according to importance. (Sumner)

 

When over seventy, in order to meet a debt for Virginia tobacco, he mortgaged his house and farm near Delaware Bay, and later mortgaged a ketch, but he was always solvent and his credit the best. (Sumner)

 


290ctl659

 

1662

 

14May 1680

 

1682

 

His will was presented to the New Haven court by his son Isaac. This was in the fOnTI of a "writeing" which appointed the widow and son Isaac as joint executors and showed about 4,390 guilders due him from the Dutch in New Amsterdam, and £100 from the English, as well as money due from Barbados and elsewhere. Isaac, Jr. declined to administer unless he might be free to act as he saw convenient, and two other trustees were appointed. The inventory of the New Haven property amounted to £118, the house estimated at£75. Isaac bought the homestead from the creditors for £120 and in 1660 deeded it to his stepmother for life, with reversion to his daughter Mrs. Elizabeth Eyes, who eventually received it.

 

Joanna Allerton is given the most important seat in the church at New Haven, for a woman.

 

Living in New Haven, CT.

 

Joanna Allerton died.

 

Sources

Mayflower Families in Progress, "Isaac Allerton," compiler Robert S. Wakefield,

 

F ASG, Genl. Society of Mayflower Descendants, [1990].

 

The Plymouth Adventure, Ernest Gebler, Doubleday, Inc., Garden City, NJ.

 

ALLERTON.ISAlll

 

ALLERTON.ISAI12

 

ALLERTON.ISAI13

 

LEE.RICHI12

 

Sumner, Edith Bartlett, Descendants of Thomas Farr of Harpswell, Maine and Ninety Allied Families, American Offset Printers, Los Angeles, CA, [1959], pp. 8-13.

 

Whittemore, Henry, Genl. Guide to the Early Settlers in America, Genl. Publ. Co., Baltimore, MD, [1967], p. 9.

 

Colonial Homes Magazine, "Pilgrim Perennials," article and pictures of Allerton's home at Plimoth Plantation, MA, restored [Oct. 1989].

 

A xeroxed book Introduction, no author or book name given.

 


-__a5ilal

 

1',

 

ISAAC ALLERTON

 

b.22 May 1627 -30 Plymouth Colony d. 25 Oct 1702 Westmoreland Co., VA m. ca. 1652

 

1)         Elizabeth ( )

d. 1655 New Haven, New Haven, CT

 

2) Elizabeth Willoughby b.1635

d. aft. 1672

 

First marriage's child number 1, Elizabeth, married twice and had six children.

 

Second marriage's child number 1, Willoughby, may have died 25 Mar 1724. He had two children. He was married three times.

 

Second marriage's child number 2, Mary, had 4 children.

 

Second marriage's child number 3, Frances, had 4 children.

 

1650

 

Graduated from Harvard University.

 

ca. 1652

 

Isaac m. 1) Elizabeth, and had two children by her.

 

ca. 1655

 

Elizabeth died in New Haven, CT.

 

1659

 

Elizabeth Willoughby m. 1) Simon Overzee, in Virginia.

 

ca. 1661

 

Elizabeth Willoughby Overzee m. 2) George Colcough.

 

ca. 1663

 

Isaac Allerton and Elizabeth Willoughby married.

 

250ctl702

 

Date of will.

 

30Decl701

 

Will proved.

 

Sources

Wakefield, Robert S., FASG, compiler, Mayflower Families in Progress, "Isaac Allerton," Genl. Soc. of Mayflower Descendants, [1990].

 


WORDEN FAMILY

 

From Wardens Past family association newsletter, Vol. XII, No. 1. rMay 19911. "More Worden Fragments (With interesting implications), George L. Bolton:

 

The last years in Old England - my recent Worden research ... has brought to light a number of facts which may well be of considerable significance in understanding the circumstances of their migration to New England.

 

... During this research I have tried to "think myself into the period" so as to understand the factors which led to their emigration. I now present the new evidence which I have obtained.

 

A sister for Peter ll!! Indeed, but unfortunately, we only leam of her by her death. The Preston Parish Registers contain the following burial entry:

 

"November 19th 1629 - Bridgat fa. (filla = daughter) Peeter Wearden"

 

Comparing this entry with others nearby leaves me little doubt that here we see recorded the death of an unmarried, probably young, daughter of Peter I, hitherto unknown to us. There is no reason... why Peter II should have been an only child. In the custom of the time, only the barest details of the father's name are given in the case of an unmarried girl like this ... it confirms that Peter I was still in Preston in very late 1628

 

Peter I lends some money! In an earlier note (Ref. 1) I mentioned one of the archives, "The White Book of Orders" - Preston Town Orders in Council 1608-1781. Carefully studying this record showed that, although in correct chronological order, entries were only made when something of importance needed to be recorded; in other words, meetings of the council could be held without an entry being made. I the early years, Peter I is listed amongst the councillors present, as previously noted ...

 

...21 January 1629 ...21 January 1630, New (dating) Style ... It seems to have been the custom, when the town needed a sum of ready money for any purpose, for the councillors and other burgesses to subscribe amounts of money to meet the need, being repaid at a later date. It must be remembered that at this date, there were no banks, no cheques (sic) and all transactions were in cash.

 

The project was concemed with the common lands of Fulwood (a suburb) and it appears that the amount involved was £90. The names are given of 29 individuals who had lent sums ranging from 4 shillings to £10 (the Mayor). The list is so headed" ... paid the day above said (i.e., 21 January 1630 N.S.) to these persons as followeth ..." In the 29 names, there appears the entry:

 

"Item to Peter Werden viij.s. (i.e. 8 shillings)" "Paid in fulL"

 

... this entry tells us that on 21 January 1630, the Wordens were still in England, in Preston ...

 

The year 1630 has a macabre significance in the town of Preston for in November of that year, the plague struck the town and between then and November 1631, some 1069 individuals out of a total population of about 3000 had died, a terribly mortality. Although no relative of Peter is recorded amongst the Preston

 


burials, the plague must be considered as a possible factor in his leaving the town. Many of the survivors did and trade in the town came almost to a standstill.

 

More money lending - I continued reading the White Book from 1630 to 1635 where, on the 9th May, I found another list of moneys lent to the town, this time for the purpose of sending persons up to London to renew the town's ancient charter. As it transpired, this was a wasted journey, as King charles I did not seem disposed to grant a new charter. Amongst the 89 names there was of course no Peter Werden, but Edmund Werden (later to be Mayor), the young brother of Ann Werden (she of the house) ..,

 

Another name caught my eye... "Captaine Ralphe Sandish, xIs." (i.e., 40 shillings). Now, to a student of early American history, a name like that is a name to excite the imagination, and I determined to see who he was. When I state that quite certainly he was Ralph, one of the younger sons of one Alexander Standish (1567­1622) of Duxbury, it is clear that here were some more names to conjure with.

 

These Standishes appear as Foreign Burgesses in the same Guild Rolls as the Wordens, as follows (not as adjacent entries ...

 

1602

 

Peter Worden

 

Alexander Standish of Duxbury and his sons, Thomas, Richard, and Ralph.

 

1622

 

Peter Worden and his son, Peter

 

Thomas Standish of Duxbury and his brothers,

Richard, Ralph, and Alexander (a younger brother; the father, Alexander, had died).

 

Little fine detail could be obtained about Ralph Sandish of Duxbury. The register of Rivington Grammar School for 1615 (Ref. 2) suggests he could have been bom about 1600. Nothing is at present known about his military service, and he was buried at Chorley Parish Church as Captaine Ralphe Standish, 15 January 1638, presumably about 38 years old, only three years after he loaned money to Preston town.

 

All these places are quite near to Preston, to the south, as follows: Clayton, 5 miles; Chorley, 8 miles; Duxbury, 9 miles; and Rivington, 11 miles, and thus, were within the social and commercial orbit of the town of Preston.

 

Conclusion and discussion: The above notes conclude the available, provable evidences of the late years of the Wordens in Preston, England, showing that they cannot have left before 21 January 1630. I feel that it is legitimate to discuss the possible implications of these facts.

 

I have long pondered how the Wordens even came to know about the newly settled colonies in America, let alone what influenced them to go to New England ... (information) could only be disseminated by word of mouth or by handwritten letters ...

 

... I examined the lists of names of known immigrants to New England prior to about 1640. With one important and perhaps vital exception, I could see no sumame which suggested that the place of origin could be Lancashire, and thus within the orbit of the Worden's experience. Immediately it must be stated that this sumame was Standish, held by Captain Myles Standish of Mayflower and subsequent Pilgrim history. I scrupulously put this thought aside as having no obvious relevance, but it seems proper to re-examine the

 


thought.

 

Standish, like Worden, is derived from a place name and lies about twelve miles to the south of Preston. Again, like Worden, several branches of the family arose in antiquity, their principal locations being Standish, Duxbury and Ormskirk. The traditional view was that Myles Standish was of the Duxbury branch, but this view has been challenged, for example, in recent times by Lawrence Hill (Ref. 3), claiming that he was from the Isle of Man branch, an offshoot of the Ormskirk branch.

 

I have given the above details to set in context the matter of Captain Ralph Standish who figures in the Preston records from 1602 to 1635 and as already stated, was of the Duxbury branch of the family.

 

The first question that arises is, what contact could there have been between Peter I and the Standishes of Duxbury? ... in the Guild year of 1622 ... Peter I, about age 46; Pe_er II, age 13; Ralph Standish, about age 22 (Alexander, the family head, had just died), but Thomas and Richard were also still living. There was certainly a potential for inter-communication. ... at the Guild, the burgesses were required to be present to register their names, but the Guild also was a great social occasion with processions and pageants. The hotels and inns were always filled with visitors. Now, I suggest that the Wordens cannot have failed to hear of the latest Colony of New England set up just less than two years before. The name Myles Standish may have been well known already and would have special significance for the Standi shes present. Indeed, they mayhave had information on the subject. Additionally, there was plenty of time between 1622 and 1630 for the Wordens to pick up further information.

 

The next and difficult question is, what contact did Myles Standish have with the Duxbury Standishes? The difficulty lies in the absence of facts about his early history... though born in the Isle of Man, he may have been educated in Lancashire at Rivington Grammar School and stayed at Duxbury whilst so doing ... the school registers only begin in 1615 with a single list for 1575, so the point cannot be established...

 

... Most biographies record that during his life in New England, in 1625 to be precise, Myles made a voyage back to the Old Country as a representative of the settlers. That excellent book, The Pilgrim Reader, by Wilson (Ref. 4), enables us to see more of the details of this trip. He sailed in the Charity for England with letters for the Adventurers Company and the Council for New England. The latest letter appears to have been dated 28 June 1625. He returned on an English fishing vessel and laid off Maine in early April 1626.

 

He was, thus, probably away about 280 days. If we allow about 60 days each way for the voyage (Mayflower took 66), this suggests that he was in England for about 160 days, or over five months. Even allowing for unknown factors, it is apparent that he had a lengthy stay in England. We know that his business in London was not particularly successful, especially as he arrived in London right in the middle of a plague. This raged from 22 December 1624 to 23 December 1625 with over 41 ,000 deaths, a parallel and precursor to the plague in Preston in 1630.

 

I can well imagine that he got out of London as soon as he could, and the question is... where did he go? We know he carried various messages, but I submit that he had plenty of time to attend to his own affairs, perhaps visiting Lancashire and/or even the Isle of Man. In Lancashire, the possible places would be Standish, Duxbury, Ormskirk, or even Preston.

 

It was several years since he had left England for his military service on the Continent and hence, into the service of the Pilgrims. We know that he had strong feelings about the lands in the North of which he believed he had been fraudulently deprived. What more natural than that he should visit the area on this occasion?

 


Coda - there is no hard evidence for any contacts of the type which I have indicated as possibilities between Peter Worden I and any of the Standishes ... However, I believe that a Standish dimension to the enigma of the Worden emigration is well within the bounds of possibility, especially when the time scale of the events concerned is considered.

 

The final decision to leave must have depended on personal circumstances such as family matters, the plague, the financial climate and other factors, but news about New England may have suggested a goal at which to aim.

 

References

G.L. Bolton, "Worden Origins," Wardens Past family association newsletter, VoL VII, NO.2, p. 397. Rivington Grammar School Register, 1615-1833, Lancashire Record Office, DDX 94/98, also DDX 94/94. L. Hill, Gentleman of Courage - Forward, Magnolia Publications, [1987] (N.B., Hill pays generous tribute to

earlier workers on this theme, in particular to the efforts ca. 1920 by the Rev. T.e. Porte us). G.F. Wilson, The Pilgrim Reader, Doubleday, New York, [1963].

 


PETER WORDEN I

 

b. 1576 of Clayton, England

d. Feb 1638 Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA bur. East Dennis, Barnstable, MA

m. Feb 1603 - 1606

 

Margaret Grice b. ca. 1556-71 d.1612

 

May have d. 1638. Also of Preston, Lancaster, England.

 

Anthony Wall, first husband of Margaret, was in 1594 mayor of Preston, and his family was engaged in textile gods. His grandson registered his pedigree and coat of arms at the Visitation of Lancashire by Sir William Dugdale in 1664 (Chet. Soc. Pt. III, Vol. 88).

 

Margaret was at least of a social status equivalent to Peter's. Margaret's father Mr. Thomas Grice was of Warrington, a town in south Lancashire at the point where the main London Road (from Preston) crossed the River Mersey.

 

Thomas Grice, Margaret's father, died long before Peter married Margaret. His will survived, along with an inventory of his goods and chattels (LRO- WCW). He made the will 2 7Mar 1583 but lived several more years, as the inventory was taken 16Feb1588 and the will was proved on 24Apr 1588. He probably died in early February, 1588.

 

In his will, Thomas Grice described himself as a yeoman. In 1664 he was described in his pedigree by his great-grandson William as "Mister," a class one step up on the social scale. He was engaged in "husbandrie" on a big scale, and was also an innkeeper. Dual occupations were common at that time. In his will he asked "that my nowe dwellinge house maie bee kepte by them"(his widow and later his sons) as an Inn, in suche sorte as I have heretofore used." The inventory of his goods revealed that thirteen rooms were listed, almost all with a distinctive name. It was a substantial residential inn, not a small beer-house.There were 24 beds, several of them testors (four-posters). It was unnamed, so cannot be located.

 

Thomas's wife Alice survived him. They had three sons under 21 when he died, John, Thomas and Lawrence, and one daughter, Marie. Lawrence turns up later as "Lawrence Gryce of Preston, shoemaker," as trustee for Anthony Wall just prior to Anthony's death (Fishwick's History of the Parish of Preston, p. 238). There is no mention of a daughter, Elizabeth, known to have been married to John Hawarden (PRO.PL6/l) , who is mentioned in the will, probably because she married before 1583. There is no mention, either of Margaret, who later became the wife of Peter Worden. She was probably 17 when the will was written, too young to be married in those days, but there is a tight time schedule and our dates could be skewed a bit. Perhaps Marie was a pet name for Margaret.

 

ca. 1590

 

Margaret Grice married Anthony Wall.

 

Decl593

 

Anthony and Margaret's oldest son was born. His name was William, and he was Anthony's heir. Pedigrees of this time lumped all daughters together after the sons, so they may have had daughter(s) earlier.

 


1601

 

Anthony Wall, first husband of Margaret, died. She had borne him five children.

 

1607

 

Involved in a fair amount of litigation from this time forward, sometimes as instigator and sometimes as defendant.

 

1610

 

Peter rented a location for a shop at Moothall in Preston, an open stall ... Elizabeth Worden, widow, at one time manned the stall. (See Worden's Past newsletter, Vol. XI, No.2, Aug. 1990 for long description of the circumstances and the charter itself which refers to rentals) (Bolton)

 

The Moothall as also known as a Guildhall, Town Hall, or Tollbooth. The one in his day was a two story building some 35' by 70' with the long axis on a north-south orientation. The upper story was for conducting town business with a Council Chamber at one end, while the lower story contained a number of shops. There were stairs at the north end which gave access to the upper story and it is inferred that Peter's shop was next to these stairs. The Moothall was next to the market place, the trading center of Preston, and many of the nearby houses had shops on the main floors. The list of commodities included meat, dairy, produce, livestock, grain, metal wares, pottery, leather, yarn and finished items of cloth. It appears Peter was in the cloth trade. (Bolton)

 

1611

 

Employed someone to plough his wife's inheritance of eight acres, for four pounds.

 

Traveled to London to pay £4 as a joint payment to the Crown, as a tenant of the Chingle Hall lands. London was 210 miles away.

 

1616

 

Margaret died early in the year (PRO-DL 1/253 - Bolton).

 

Aug1612

 

He was Town Councillor in the town of Preston.

 

Septl616

 

Sold certain properties (LRO-QDD 22/28 and 22/29 - Bolton) which were previously held by Margaret, her portion of her former husband's estate and which he inherited upon her death. Possibly her family now was taking care of her children from her first husband.

 

Octl617

 

Peter leased from the town a shop and a "standing" (stall) in Moothall in the center of Preston, the actual shop being on the ground floor under the Council chamber. Probably this was a textile shop.

 

1622

 

Another Guild year. Peter was entered in the Rolls in his own right. Although he probably lived in Preston, he is listed as a "Foreign Burgess" because that is how he and his ancestors first obtained their Burgess rights. He entered Peter, 13, as this was his first opportunity to be entered.

 

1625

 

Around this time occurred the John Lewis episode (see Part III, below).

 

1628

 

Peter took an important office (PRO-PL, 6/12, No. 55 - Bolton) as County Aulnager or Alnager. This was an officer in a port or market town responsible for ensuring that all cloth sold was woven to the correct length and width laid down by statute (standards were first laid down in 1191). The aulnager then stamped the approved cloth with an appropriate seal. This office had peculiar significance in Preston, where some 50 years before Peter's time the town had claimed that a charter of Queen Elizabeth I exempted them from paying County

 


1628

 

19Nov1628

 

Aft. 1628

 

2lJan1629

 

ca. 1629

 

Nov1630

 

1630-35

 

ca. 1631

 

/fees for this sealing, and in any case, the cloths made in Preston were not included in the statute.

 

Actually, the office of County Aulnager was really held by Roger Langton (son of a Leyland man and four times Mayor of Preston) in 1605,1616,1632, and 1639. He was also a draper. But he deputed the office to Peter. Peter held it until 1634 but his tenure became the subject of a Chancery bill of complaint.

 

The new Company or Fraternity of Drapers and Mercers, etc. was set up ... Peter was probably a founder.

 

Daughter Bridget died and was buried at Preston Church, indicating they lived at Preston and not Clayton at this time. She was about age 21 when she died.

 

Sometime after this, Peter II and possibly his sister Elizabeth, what remained of the family, moved with their father, Peter, to Clayton.

 

In "The White Book of Orders," Preston Town Orders in Council 1608-1781, there is an entry regarding Peter I, concerning a financial transaction. The "new style" date would be 21Jan1630. It seems to have been the custom that when the town needed a sum of ready money for any purpose, the councilors and other burgesses to subscribe amounts of money to meet the need to be repaid later. There were, of course, no banks, or checks, and all transactions were in cash. The project was concerned with the common lands of Fulwood (a suburb) and it appears that the amount involved was £90. The names were given of 29 individuals who had been lent sums ranging from 4 shillings to £10 (the mayor). The list is headed" ... paid the day abovesaid (i.e. 21Jan1630 N.S.) to these persons as followeth ..." In the 29 names, there appears the entry:

 

"Item to Peter Werden viij.s. (i.e., 8 shillings)." "Paid in fulL"

 

Elizabeth, his daughter, married Hugh Swansey of Brindle near Clayton ... their first child was baptized at Brindle in Aug 1630.

 

The plague began in Preston ... the full onset was sudden, mortality had been increasing, and Peter may have decided at this time to move to Clayton. They did escape illness and death in this 12-month epidemic.

 

The first case of plague was on November 10th. Between then and November 1631, 1069 of the 3000 inhabitants had died.

 

Two of Peter's three Swansey grandchildren died.

 

Peter never knew that his son Peter would eventually have a son Peter, carrying on the Worden line to today. He died before this child was born.

 

Peter bought a quantity of wine for £40 - that was a lot of wine and indicated he was diversifYing his matenals from cloth only.

 

Shortly later he was selling wine and a quantity of pieces of cloth for 7 .162.6d... probably the

 


same wme. Quite a profit.

 

His son-in-law, Hugh Swansey, was described at this time as a vintner (wine merchant) of Kirkham, which ties in exactly with the Parish Records (see Part II).

 

bef1634

 

In the case over the aulnager, he is referred to as "Peter Worden of Clayton, Gent."

 

Marl636

 

(PRO-PL 6/12, No. 83 - Bolton) Peter is plaintiff in a case and refers to "a messuage and a dwelling house in Clayton aforesaid where your orator (himself) now laleth and inhabiteth," so he quite clearly lived in Clayton by this time.

 

ca. 1638

 

About this time, Peter went to New England.

 

bef1642

 

Peter's elder brother William, head of the family, died, and his three children survived with right to the estate. However there were other cottages on the land and the two Peters may have lived in one of them. This ancient home of the Wordens is called Hole House.

 

From Wardens Past family association newsletter, Vol. XI, No.2, [August 19901. "Another Worden Fragment," George L. Bolton:

 

Preston is an ancient and important administrative town about five miles from Leyland and Clayton ... because it had an ancient charter, it is known as a Borough.

 

The early archives of the town are a separate entity from those of the Lancashire Record Office. One of these consists of a rental of 1670 recording premises leased to various people that year (Ref. 1).

 

"Rents due to the major Ballffe and Burgesses of the towne of Preston at the feaste of the annunciation of the blessed virgin Mary and St. Michaell the ArchAngell by equall portions as followeth:

 

"I tern of Elizabeth Werden widdowe for one shop on the east side of the moothall next adjoyning to the staires at the north end of the hall with a standing at the south end of the hall formerly demised to Peter Werden by lease dated primo Oct XVthJac ye improved yearly rentof£01-15s-00d." (This is one of several similar items.)

 

...by the self-contained evidence ... (Ref. 2), important information comes tumbling out.

 

"Widdowe Werden" in spite of her name need not concem us much. There was more than one person of her name in Preston in 1670, although I think I know which one she was. The vital point is that she was renting a shop and a standing (an open stall) in the Moothall in 1670. As so often occurs in period documents, where it was necessary to identify precisely where particular premises were located, a back reference was given to a previous occupier's lease of tex same premises. Weare thus provided with the fact that Peter Worden Senior, for this is who it is and whom we believe equates with Peter Worden I of America, took out a lease of these premises from the township on the first of October 1617. This is momentous information, especially as it is possible to identify exactly where these premises were located in the town.

 

... Peter Worden was a "Foreign Burgess" (literally a foreigner or outsider) not by right of residence in the town but by the fact that his ancestors had acquired burgess rights and could pass them on to their children. Such rights were a valuable privilege, particularly for trading purposes.

 


The moothall mentioned in Peter's lease is of interest. It was variously known also as a Guildhall, Town, Hall, or Tollbooth, the first two of these names persisted until recent times. Preston has been unlucky with its Town Halls - an early one is quoted... as having been burned down by Robert Bruce in 1322. We do not know when the one with which Peter would have been familiar was built but it survived until 1780 when it fell down, to be replaced ...

 

The Moothall of his day was a two storey (sic) building some 35 feet by 70 feet with the long axis on a north­south orientation. The upper storey was for conducting town business with a Council chamber at one end, whilst the lower storey contained an (unknown) number of shops. There were stairs at the north end which gave access to the upper storey, and we infer that Peter's shop was next to those stairs.

 

... It is quite impossible to determine if he operated the shop himself or employed labour, or, indeed, what commodity he sold. The Moothall was next to the market place, the trading centre of Preston, and many of the nearby houses had a shop on the ground floor. The list of commodities ... (given) for the vicinity is very wide and includes meat, dairy produce, livestock, grain, metal wares, pottery, leather, yam, and finished items of cloth. Because of the occupations of the persons who seem to be associated with such few references to Peter which we have, I incline to the (unsupported) view that he might have been connected with the cloth trade ... I have been able to locate where Peter's shop lay in relation to the actual ground features of present day Preston ...

 

... It must be appreciated that in England very often the medieval town plan (layout) strongly dominates the present day structure of the town. ... Fishergate is still the main street of the town; Cheapside is still there. I am pleased to report that even with all the changes which have taken place in nearly 400 years, it is possible to stand in the exact spot where Peter's shop was located.

 

References

Preston Corporation Rental Book of 1670.

Manuscript plans of Preston drawn by Doctor Richard Kuerden in circa 1684. Lancashire Record Office DDX 194/2 and DDX 194/3.

Manuscript, Description of the Town of Preston, Doctor Richard Kuerden, circa 1688. Original in London but several printed extracts exist, the most useful for the present purpose is in C. Hardwick, Preston and Its Environs, Preston [1857].

 

From Worden's Past family association newsletter, Vol. XI, No.3, [Nov. 19901. "More About Ann Werden's House in Preston," George L. Bolton:

In my note, "A Worden Fragment," [WP, Vol. X, No.2, pg. 583], I quoted a 19th century source which described a house erected in the centre of Preston in 1629 by Ann Jenkinson (formerly Werden), the recent widow of John Jenkinson, draper, pointing out the discrepancy in the relationship of this Ann to Peter Worden Senior where itwas formerly but erroneously thought that she was his daughter. However, there was some close tie as not yet unexplained.

 

During more recent research into Peter Worden's early 17th century connection with the central Market­place area of Preston [WP, Vol. XI, No.2, pg. 673], a few further facts come to light. ... the site on which her house was erected was within a very short distance indeed of that site in the Moothall where Peter had his shop at a slightly earlier date. ... This was the commercial centre of Preston and the house was built on what we should now call "a prime site."

 

... the Moothall was owned by the Borsmgh (Town Corporation) but the house was on a privately owned area obviously in the early 17th century being developed into houses and shops ... In ca. 1340, Sir Richard

 


Hoghton founded a chantry in the Preston Church, the Chantry of the Holy Rood or Crucifix, and endowed it with many parcels of land in the town. Like very many others, this chantry was suppressed at the Reformation and in 1547 became the property of the Crown represented by the Duchy of Lancaster who eventually sold the site to the Hodgkinsons and from whom John Jenkinson leased it in 1626.

 

... his widow, Ann, very wisely bought the freehold of the site before carrying out the terms of her husband's will and erecting the pre-fabricated frame-built house which obviously he had purchased in the year before his death... I have been unable to trace her purchase deed (the freehold cost her £60, a large sum for those day) or to locate either her will, or that of her husband (Fleetwood) ...

 

From Worden's Past family association newsletter, Vol. XIII, No. 1. rMay 19921. "Peter Worden 1's Wife," George L. Bolton, Part I:

... the value of the Chancery documents is such that we are now able, without the slightest doubt or ambiguity to state that:

 

Peter Worden I of Clayton married Margaret Wall, widow of Anthony Wall, of Preston

 

This vital information is contained in a Palatine Chancery Court action (PRO-PL6/1, No. 37) brought in 1607 by a certain Anthony Barton against "Peter Worden and Margaret his wife," regarding her dower (widows share for life) of the inheritance of her former husband, Anthony Wall of Preston, deceased. In the reply (PRO-PUll, No. 20), it is stated that the original action had been brought in the summer of 1606.

 

... Anthony Wall died on 24 April 1604 and an executrix account (LRO-DRCH) dated 14 February 1603 refers to Margaret still as a widow. We can thus date Peter's marriage to the fairly narrow time span from February 1603 to (say) July 1606. We can go further, as a completely unrelated document (LRO-QDD 22/28 and 22/29) makes reference to a lease made by Peter Worden and his wife, the lease being dated 23 March 1604. The gap in our knowledge about the date of their marriage has thus been reduced to some twelve months (Feb. 1603 - March 1604) ...

 

... no record of (the marriage) has been found elsewhere (than Preston, so the action of where they married) is unanswered ...

 

The Wall family were well known in Preston, apparently dealing in made up textile goods, and Anthony was, in fact, Mayor of Preston in 1594. His grandson thought fit to register his pedigree and coat of arms at the Visitation of Lancashire by Sir William Dugdale in 1664 (Chet. Soc. Pt. III, Vol. 88). There is, of course, no mention... of Anthony's widow having a second marriage with Peter Worden, as it did not affect the Wall genealogy.

 

... Peter's wife was of a social status at least equivalent to his own ... for a short time, at least, Peter had a fairly large and perhaps troublesome step-family.

 

... the Wall pedigree, lodged by her grandson ... is quite clear... and states that she was the daughter of Mr. Thomas Grice of Warrington ... Warrington was a town in south Lancashire at the point where the main London road (i.e., from Preston) crossed the River Mersey. Its location on the London road is probably not without significance in the story.

 

The Warrington parish records exist from only 1591, and as her birth has not been traced to any other location, to get even an indication of her birth year, it is necessary to resort to a little arithmetic. We know

 


from his will that Peter Worden II (son of Peter I and the said Margaret) was bom ca. 1609. Let us assume that Peter II was the last-bom child of the couple (there is no evidence of the point ...) and that Margaret was oflate child-bearing age, perhaps as much as 43 years old. This would yield a date of birth for her of 1566 and I do not think it was much earlier, if at all.

 

Now consider her first family. Anthony Wall died 1601 and Margaret had bome him 5 children. Allowing for ten years in which this occurred (typical for the period ...) this might suggest that Anthony and Margaret were married about 1590, and if she was as young as 19, then it would give her birth as about 1571. The son William was, in fact, Anthony's eldest son and heir, and we know he was bom in December 1593. Pedigrees were "male chauvinistic" and lumped all daughters after the sons, so we cannot see if William was the eldest child of either sex ...

 

I suggest that Margaret was bom something like 1566 to 1571 which would make her somewhat (but not incompatibly) older than Peter 1.

 

Peter and Margaret Worden's Family:

... it appears that Peter and Margaret had three children, two daughters and one son, but it is not clear in which order they were bom ...

 

... Peter Worden II was bom (by his own statement) inca. 1609... daughter, Bridget, (is) only recorded by her burial at Preston Parish church in November 1628 ... in the case of the other daughter (not previously known to us), the Chancery records    reveal not only her name but a great deal of information. A late Palatine

Chancery Court case (PRO-OL6112, No. 83) ... shows that her name was Elizabeth ... named after Margaret's elder sister ... (probably) bom earlier than Bridget.

 

... Elizabeth could have been the first bom ... the order was (probably) Elizabeth, Bridget, then Peter ... it is sad to relate that it was not long before Peter I was left with three young children to look after as another Chancery case (PRO-DLl/266) dated 1616 indicates that Margaret, his wife, had died ...

 

... Elizabeth, Peter's daughter, became married to a man by the name of Hugh Swansey and by him had three children. Swansey was a Brindle man, Brindle being a village immediately to the east of Clayton, and furthermore, Swansey is the name of a small portion of Clayton/Whittle near the Brindle border ...

 

... the Swanseys were a highly significant family in the area, ancient freeholders, with a long pedigree registered as early as the Visitation of Richard St. George in 1613 (Chet. Soc. Vol. 82). Hugh was mentioned in the pedigree but was only 6 or 7 years old at the date ... (the article continues about Hugh Swansey and his wife, Elizabeth Worden, and their family).

 

From Worden's Past family association newsletter. Vol. XIII. No.2. rAugust 19921. "More Worden Origins." George L. Bolton. Part III:

(Article refers only to grandchildren bom before Peter I's death in 1639 and bom in Old England. Children bom to Peter II after the death of his father are not included.)

 

In the late 16th and early 17th centuries, Lancashire was the county most reluctant to adopt the reformed Anglican religion and one where Roman Catholicism lingered. In early 1599 four itinerant preachers were authorized at a salary of £50 per annum each to be called "Queen's Preachers." After Elizabeth I's death, they were called King's Preachers. Stationed at different places in Lancashire, they were not subject to local church and were not supposed to have a church of their own. They all had university degrees. They were treated with hostility.

 

/\

 


Lancashire was mainly in the Diocese of Chester and the bishop helped to choose these preachers. In the 1620's the Bishop of Chester was John Bridgeman, former Canon of Wig an, a bad judge of character. He was a notable pursuer of sinners, which made him unpopular. This trait also made him enemies. Like other bishops, one of his duties was to collect and forward to the king, who from 1625 was Charles I, the money received in fines from recusants (Roman Catholics). In 1632 he was accused of failing to do this properly and the issue, before the High Commission, became clouded by wild accusations, palpably unlikely, against his character.

 

He retaliated by cataloging the alleged character defects of the witnesses against him and ultimately he was cleared of the charges. This case is interesting for the judicial procedures of the time. The principal witnesses against him were three Kings Preachers, all of whom he had appointed and one of whom was John Lewis. It is clear that all three (the other two were James Martin and Bartholomew Cade) had become thorough villains, even allowing for the wild accusations and counter-accusations of the adversarial court action.

 

John Lewis, who is oddly connected to the Wordens of the time, was the son of Thomas Lewis and was baptized lOJu11597 at St. Mary Woolnoth, City of London. He entered Sydney Sussex College, Cambridge University, as a sizar (part fee-paying) in 1614, Bachelor of Arts 1617-18, Master of Arts, 1621. He was ordained Deacon on 20Septl618 and on the next day, the 21st, he married J udith Spenser at All-Hallows-on­the-Wall, only 400 yards from his baptismal church. He was ordained a priest in Dec 1618.

 

On 2Ju11620 he was acting as curate at St. Albans near London when Bishop Bridgeman heard him preach and was so impressed that he carried him off to Wigan, Lancashire. Lewis was appointed Master of Wig an Grammar School with extra salary for preaching sermons. He was appointed King's Preacher sometime before 1623.

 

He brought his wife with him as their daughter, Susan, was baptized at Wigan 2Ju11621. About this time he moved to Ormskirk nearby and on 17Feb1624, the register shows that his wife Judith was buried in the high chancel, and on the same day his son Benjamin was baptized, a strange conjunction. He is referred to as Mr. John Lewis, Kings Preacher.

 

In 1624 he published a religious treatise dedicated to the Earl of Derby, to whom he claimed to be Chaplain, and only 14 weeks after his wife's death he married Anne Ambrose, daughter of the vicar at Ormskirk ... he was 27 and she 37. She did not survive long as the Ormskirk register shows Anne Lewis, wife ofJohn, Clerk, buried in the church on 15Septl626. Marrying this soon after being widowed was not unusual in those times.

 

For an unknown length of time he had been active in the Preston area, not only in a priestly fashion. At Midsummer Quarter Sessions 1626 held at Ormskirk Court, John Lewis, Clerk (i.e., Holy Orders) was bound over in the sum of £10 to keep the Kings Peace to all men, especially to Hugh Massie, and to appear at the next Quarter Sessions. We do not know if he did.

 

On 300ctl626, less than six weeks after the death of his last wife, he married Anne Moore at Preston. She was well connected with a family pedigree. Her fate is unknown. The names of Vicars of Preston from 1623 to 1626 are unknown and he may have been preaching there, which he was allowed to do, without actually being Vicar except perhaps in his own estimation.

 

Worse was to come. At the April 1628 Quarter Sessions at Ormskirk, one Worthington claimed that "about six years ago" (in 1622), John _wis, '1ate preacher," had left an infant of his called Elizabeth with Worthington and his wife to be nursed, but was behind with payment for the service to the tune of £4 and "is fledd out of the country (i.e., the county), and no grandparents are known." This means he could not be

 


found locally. It seems possible that this child was an illegitimate one as his wife, Judith, was alive in 1624. The child was recorded in 1628 as "being put on the parish."

 

It isn't surprising that he could not be found, as Bishop Bridgeman's defense alleged he had fled to London and was acting as curate therein 1628 - 1631, although debarred from ministry. He was also accused of many other things, including frequently ale houses, blasphemy, gambling, fighting or duelling with rapier, pistol or truncheon, with many men including Hugh Massie. He also was said to have left two children in Wigan, one in Ormskirk and one in Lancashire (?), who were reduced to begging. It was even hinted that one of his wives had not died of natural causes.

 

The most dramatic event for us in this catalog of sins is as follows:

 

"He hath a bastard at Leyland, begot on ELIZABETH WEREDEN."

 

The gender of this child is not stated and the loss of the Leydon Parish Register hampers consideration. The existence of this child is very probably true.

 

Who, then, was Elizabeth Wereden (Worden)? Further evidence came from an unexpected quarter. Itwas obvious that Bishop Bridgeman had assistance in preparing his own defense against the trumped up charges before a Commission in London. The Bridgeman family papers have survived in the Staffordshire County Record Office, some 70 miles to the south.

 

One of the papers, a letter (SRO D1287/18/2) dated 25Feb1633 from the Vicar of Lancashire, August Wyldbore, Doctor of Divinity, provides the Bishop with a great deal of ammunition for his fight against his accusers. One of his charges against John Lewis reads:

 

"4. His Incontinence with Elizabeth ye daughter of Peter Werden, then a single woman, but not maryed to one Swansye in Kirkham by whom he had a bastard child (still) alive, although being examined thereupon in ye High Commission Court, he utterly foreswore it."

 

A note in the margin records "Adultery with Werdens Daughter by whom he had a bastard." August Wyldbore, D.D. was in a good position to know the facts of such matters, as from 1626 to 1630 he was Victor of Preston. He followed the uncertain period when Martin had been vicar and Lewis had claimed to be.

 

Obviously Elizabeth was the daughter of Peter Worden 1. When the Bishop was stating his case in 1633, Elizabeth was married to Hugh Swansey and Peter almost certainly was back living in Clayton. Is it possible to infer that Elizabeth had left this illegitimate child with her father on her marriage?

 

It is likely that the liaison occurred in the period 1625-1628 when Lewis was in the Preston area, although a married man. He would be 28-31 years old and Elizabeth Worden was 20-23. The possibilities for the meeting of the two persons can only be speculated upon, but Peter Worden, and the London-born, wild, duel­fighting preacher could well have been acquainted with one another in the town of Preston.

 

It is a matter of regret that the sources do not mention the sex of the child. There is no baptismal entry. It was customary for illegitimate children to take the surname of the mother, in this case, Worden, although there were exceptions. It was almost unknown for middle classes to have two baptismal, or given, forenames, e.g. John Lewis Worden. This device was used much later in such cases, but this might have been an early example of this device.

 


At the time of Peter's emigration he had two grandchildren living: Robert Swansey aged about seven and a Lewis/W orden child of unknown sex aged about eleven.

 

The scene moves to New England. The Will of Peter I of Yarmouth, New England, dated 1639, makes reference to "John Lewis" and "to my grandchild." It now seems likely that John Lewis of the will could very well have been the child of Peter's daughter Elizabeth and the preacher, John Lewis.

 

Conclusion

It is accepted that the long-standing problem of identification of the John Lewis in old Peter's will has been solved, he would seem to have been a true grandchild of Peter, in 1639 aged about fourteen, old enough to have made the voyage a little earlier and thus, conforming to the limitation of being less than eighteen which can be deduced from the terms of the will, Peter II would be his maternal uncle and thus eminently suitable to be appointed as the boy's guardian.

 

Srce. #708, Copyright by George L Bolton, Leyland, England, [February 1992].

 

Antiq. Soc., trans. H.S.Lc., Vol. 132

Axon, E., The King's Preachers in Lancashire, 1599-1845, trans. L and C.

Bridgeman, G.T.O., History of the Church and Manor of Wig an, Chet. Soc. N.S., Vol. 16, [1888]. Earl of Bradford (Weston Park) MSS, SRO - D. 1287/18/2.

Fishwick, H., History of the Parish of Preston, [1900].

International Genealogical Index, Microfiche for London.

Printed Parish Records, Wigan Vol. 4, Ormskirk Vol. 13, Preston Vol. 498, LP.R. Soc. Quantrell, B.W., Lancashire Wills, the King's Will, and the Troubling Bishop Bridgeman, trans. H.S.Lc.,

Vol. 132.

Quarter Sessions Recogizances, LRO-QSB 1110/10, WSB 1138/64.

Venn, J. and J .A., Matriculations and Degrees, University of Cambridge, 1544-1659.

Victoria County history of Lans., Vol. 7, p. 86.

Visitation of Yorkshire, Moore of Lower Harrop, 1665, Suretees Society, Vol. 31,1834.

 

From Worden's Past family association newsletter. Vol. XIII. No.2. fNov 19921. "More Worden Origins." George L Bolton. Part IV - edited:

 

... Since 1542, the Wordens had been entered in the Preston Guild Rolls at 20 year intervals as out-burgesses, and in the 1582 Guild, Peter and his two elder brothers, all under 13 years old, were duly entered even though their father, Robert, had died in 1580, the value of membership being so great.

 

I have no reason to doubt that Peter was educated at Leyland Grammar School which was well established by then even if it had not been moved from the Church to the newly built premises ... the brothers were again listed, in the 1602 Guild ... Peter as (probably) still living in Clayton.

 

... By now (the brothers) were establishing their own families and... the holding in Clayton would not support Peter. It is probable that (Peter) was already engaged in commercial activities in the nearby town of Preston, a five mile horse ride away.

 

... Peter was probably a merchant.. everyone in Preston with whom we can see an association, including his unrelated family namesakes, seem to be mercers or drapers.

 

... In 1603 or 1604 he came to marry Margaret (Grice), widow of Anthony Wall, as shown in Part I of this

 


account. He witnessed Elizabeth Orrell's will 23 January 1607. She was the widow of John Orrell ofT urton.

 

Elizabeth mentioned that she wished to be buried in the Clayton Chapel in Leyland parish church ... The Orrell family at this period were claimants to the Lordship of the Manor of Clayton where Peter was born. There were four witnesses: Roger Langton, Thomas Ryley, Peter Worden and Richard Charnock. It may be that they were just convenient as witnesses, being Preston men, but it seems more than a coincidence that Peter's family were freeholders of the testator's lands.

 

By 1609 Peter and Margaret had three children; two daughters and Peter II, and Margaret had five children from her marriage with Anthony Wall. ... They probably later lived in the principal Wall residence when her son William inherited it when he came of age in 1614. Itis not known where they lived until then.

 

He was called "Peter Worden of Preston" for example in the action over Margaret's dower (PRO-PL 6/1, No. 37) and... was involved in the administrative work of the town, often being called on as a juror in Inquisitions Post Mortem. As early as 1612 he was Town Councillor of the town of Preston, regulating the affairs of the town.

 

The Chancery records show (PRO.PL 6/8, No. 81 of March 1627) mentions that earlier, in ca. 1611, the occupiers, that is the tenants of Chingle Hall lands, were required to make a joint payment to the Crown, perhaps of about £4.00 in all, and that it was arranged that Peter Worden would carry this money to london and obtain clearance for the obligation. Although journeys to London, 210 miles, were taken often, it was no light matter ... it seems that he must have combined this mater with some other purpose, in order to undertake the trip. The same document says he was employing someone to plough eight acres of land (Margaret's inheritance) for the sum of £4.

 

Srce. #708, Copyright by George L. Bolton, Leyland, England, March, 1992

 

Most of the notes with dates, above, are from Bolton.

 

George 1. Bolton, Worden's Past family association newsletter, VoL XIV, No. L fMav 19931, Forward to Parts VI, VII & VIII, and those parts:

 

These three short pieces describe the contents of individual Chancery Court Bills of Complaint as illustrations of how the information in them can be interpreted to add to our knowledge of the life and times of the Wordens. They are not in chronological order, but in the order they came to me in the transcriptions of the original Court documents made by Miss Angela Barlow which I then incorporated into the overall narrative of the parts of "More Worden Origins."

 

They are set out fairly fully to illustrate how the lawyer concerned put together a bill of complaint from the statements of the plaintiff or plaintiffs and show how early 17th Century civil legal actions were conducted. Unfortunately the responses of the defendants of the court decisions are not always available, but nevertheless the genealogical and other information in the bills is invaluable.

 

Part VI -1669: The Old Worden Estate Endangered?

 

This short section is an illustration of how the Chancery Bills can provide unexpected information about the Worden estate in Clayton and Leyland. It is based on the latest dated Palatine Chancery Bill examined so far by Miss Barlow, reference PRO-PL 6/27 No. 118 dated August 1669.

 


To appreciate its complexities, it is necessary to consider three generations of the Worden family, namely:

 

William Worden, 1569, died before 1648, elder brother of Peter Worden I

 

James Worden, his son and heir, born ca. 1600, died 1665

 

William Worden, his son and heir, born ca. 1653, died 1704

 

The Chancery bill is what may be termed "a defensive action" to protect the title and ownership of the Worden land by holding against claims made to it by others, as will be described.

 

The bill of complaint was submitted to John Otway Esquire (later Sir John), Vice Chancellor of the County Palatine of Lancaster by young William Worden (1653-1704). He was the survivor of the three generations outlined above and therefore, the current inheritor of the estate. As he was only 16 at the time, he had to be represented through a "next friend," namely John Farnsworth, gentleman. The latter was of Runs haw Hall, the estate next door to Shaw Hall (the present Worden Hall in Leyland, the former home of the F arlington family). It is interesting to note that Farnsworth was a prominent Roman Catholic which may say something about the allegiance of the Wordens left behind when Peter went to America.

 

The estate is described as "a capital messuage and tenement called Wordens House together with several cottages and 50 acres ofland meadow and pasture lying in Clayton and Leyland." This is some confirmation that the old Worden holding was an enclave lying on both sides of "Werdenbroc" as I have described earlier. The interesting remark is made that "the lands had remained and continued in the surname and blood of the

said William Worden, the grandfather ... and might continue as long as it should please God to permit ..." It is curious how this idea of the antiquity and continuity of the Wordens repeatedly crops up in documentation.

 

It thus seems that old william had intended an entail to keep the lands in the succession of the eldest son in each generation (which confirms why Peter I, a third son, could really never inherit the estate), but that the documents were missing. It is also apparent (from other sources), that from the early 17th century, the estate was becoming fragmented by sales, leases and mortgages of small portions of the land. Land on the Leyland side had earlier passed to the Wordens of Chester and sold by them without hope of recovery.

 

It is also clear that the Wordens were trying to consolidate their holding by such means as exchanges ofland and now by this present action at law to reconfirm their title to the estate.

 

Somehow, it seems that a motley crew of some 12 claimants had gotten wind of the shaky nature of the paper title and were "combining and confederating" to try to get hold of the land. It would be tedious to list those claimants but with a knowledge of the local history of the period, it is possible to see them as various trustees, lessees, or just neighbors involved in former transactions. Some of them claimed title by virtue of alleged deeds made by James, young William's late father, or even by old William, the grandfather.

 

Some, and here is the interesting bit, claimed against alleged conveyances mad_ by Peter Wor_n, younger brother of the said William, the grandfather. Young William states that Peter had no title in th_ premises except for the fact that the elder William had mortgaged the premises to his brother Peter for a small sum of __y. .

 

This was a hitherto unknown fact and suggests that Peter, having gone into trade, was wealthier than William who had stayed on the land. I feel that the mortgage must have been redeemed because in 1648, James (in

 


another document) clearly states that he holds the premises in fee simple. Unless, of course, Peter went off to America with unredeemed mortgage in his pocket and James held the premises by default. Perhaps this is why the title deeds were missing in 16691

 

Young William refers to Peter I as "his great unckle, long deceased" (actually 30 years ago) and makes the extraordinary claim that he, William, is Peter's heir at law and lawful administrator of his goods and chattels. Now William chose to ,ignore, or perhaps did not even know of the existence of Peter II who clearly was the lawful heir 01 Peter I. Perhaps it is not surprising as they had left for America 17 years before the boy was bom, although he seemed to know or not unreasonably to have assumed that Peter I was long dead.

 

The upshot 01 the action was that William asked the Court to make "confederates" appear and produce their titles to the e_te (he claims that they had destroyed some of his own titles) and to yield up any monies they had improper!y drawn from it.

 

There is no record of any reply to this interesting bill of complaint and it is unlikely that any was expected. It was merely-a warning to the claimants that the mater had been put before the court and they had bettor be careful how they proceeded in the future.

 

ItisiRstrucriye to compare this information with the 1639 will of Peter I in which he bequeathes to Peter H his "lan_ l_ses and tenements with gods movable and immovable in the town of Clayton in the Cdtmty of ,Lancaster,ff an inheritance which the present Chancery bill suggests might have been somewhat insubStantial.

 

,'in any ca_, there .is no evidence that Peter II tried to prove his father's will in Old England. andinbis °W:li

    'Will, he_ no mention of the Clayton estate, only referring to property in England which C1iffie tlupugh

    his wite,"'faty.                                                                                                                                                                          ,

 


A Note on the Palatine Chancery Court

 

I have made frequent mention of the documents of the above Court and it may be helpful to describe what the actual court consisted of. Miss Barlow had indicated that the court was held at Preston. Others tel us that since the reign of Edward III (1327-1377) Preston, although not the County town, had been made by the above monarch the principal quarters of the Palatine and Duchy Courts of the county although the latter was only a branch of the Westminster Court. The Assizes, however, were held at Lancaster, the county town.

 

We may ask where, in a town of the 17th and earlier centuries with mainly primitive buildings, the actual court was held. Once again we turn to Dr. Richard Kuerden who writing in 1684 makes it absolutely clear that the Town Hall (formerly named the Moothall) was the venue. This is the self same Moothall which I described in my article (Wardens Past, Vol. XI, No. 2,page 673) in connection with Peter 1's shop of an earlier day. The shop was, of course, on the ground floor of the Council and other functions were on the upper floor. These included Guild business, the Quarter Sessions, the Court of Common Please, and also the Palatine Chancery Court, a scene of much activity.

 

Dr. Kuerden states "In this place is held the Honourable Court of Chancery for the Palatine of Lancaster where sits the worthy and most judicious Sir John Ottway, in whose equitable breast and judgement remaineth the deciding of all controversies brought before him; within the exchequer sit the learned gentlemen of the long robe."

 

It appears later that no writs could be processed within the county except through the medium of Local Attorneys-at-Law in the Court of Chancery who acted as agents to Attorneys and Solicitors in other towns in the county. Thus, the Preston attorneys seem to have cornered the business, but as Miss Barlow points out, attending at Preston was far better than having to travel to London, made possible because of the Palatinate having its own courts.

 

The Attorney who prepared young William's bill of complaint (and signed it) was Edward Rigby, Sergeant-at­Law, from a legal family and himself a Clerk of the Crown, so William would have been well represented if the case had come to court.

 

(Source #708, Copyright by George L. Bolton, Leyland, England, [March 1992])

 

From Worden's Past family association newsletter. Vol. XIV. No.2. fAug. 19931:

"More Worden Origins," George L. Bolton -- Worden versus Barfield and Worden versus Swansey:

 

Part 7:

On 12Mar1636 , a bill of complaint (PRO-PL6/12 , No. 83) was submitted to the Palatine Chancery Court on behalf of Peter Worden (1). In some ways, it is a strange bill, being directed against two separate persons on two quite different matters. It has both serious and even amusing elements, one being that the only common feature happens to be a quantity of wine. And yet, it is a key document and tells us much about Peter's family and English grandchildren.

 

The first thing to note is the date of the bill, which gives us a possible departure date of the Wordens from England very much later than previously thought.

 

The first half of the complaint against a William Barfield of Hawkley (near Wigan) is straight forward but is none the less interesting. Peter, stayed to be "of Clayton," had in 1631 bought a quantity of wine from Barfield and promised £40 for it but had not paid up by the due date. He was asked to go to Wigan, and on arrival,

 


he was threatened with a warrant and obliged to sign documents (dated 20 February 1632), these consisting of using his house (but which house?) and two fields in Clayton as security for the debt.

 

The fields were called Intacke and Haslecrooke (some five acres in all), the latter can be identified with some certainty as being part of the main Worden holding in Clayton. As he was in a position to do this, surely this lends colour to the fact that William, his brother, had mortgaged at least part of the holding to Peter prior to 1632 (?).

 

There then follows a complicated, if not to say confusing, recitation of monetary offers, bonds, and recognizanes, Wigan Court writs and disputes of the actual amounts owing and Barfield's refusal to settle the debt. It seems evident that Barfield wanted the land, not the money repaying, and had seized a cow and two colts of Peter's (valued at £ 1 0) and even claimed Peter's house.

 

There is no evidence of a reply by the defendant Barfield so the case may have been settled out of court. In view of the date of the bill, the possibility of Peter having gone to American with the claim still unsettled must not be overlooked.

 

*******

 

The second and longer part of the bill of complaint has no connection with the first, but similarly, it is dealing with events that occurred about 1632 and the two sections may have been lumped together for convenience. The case may have taken a long time to come to court, perhaps not surprisingly when the long-winded recital of the facts of the claim is considered. The attorney's potential gain in fees is matched by our gain in information, for this bill tells us a great deal of what we now know about Peter's elder daughter.

 

The complaint is directed against Hugh Swansey of Kirkham described as a vintner; that is, a wine merchant, and (as I have shown in Part 2, earlier), we are not long before we learn that Hugh had (about 1629) married Peter's daughter, Elizabeth. The more mundane parts of Peter's complaint against Swansey can be surmised as: failure to pay for goods sold (some £13 owing), failure to return goods loaned (value £10), and even actual theft of goods (value £3). Even by the standards of the day, these are not massive amounts. In passing, we may note that the wine and some pieces of cloth that Peter had sold to Swainsey, amounted to some £47 and it is not unreasonable to suppose that this wine could have been the same wine that Peter bought from Barfield, above. For interest, the items of goods described in the bill are listed separately at the end of this account.

 

The main thrust of the complaint is that Peter, about 1631, had given Swansey "divers great somes of money for the marriage porcion" of his daughter, Elizabeth. In return, Swansey "being seised in his demesne as of fee

(i.e., as a freeholder) of divers landes and hereditaments" had promised to make a settlement of these lands, ete., in the form of an entail, first to himself, then to the first son he might have with Elizabeth and then to the heirs of that son (which, if that son died young, the heir would be the second son, as indeed happened).

 

As earlier recounted in Part 2, the eldest son, Edmund, died young leaving Robert as the rightful heir. A third son was born later but soon died. At the time this bill was first transcribed from the Chancery records, the fact that Elizabeth had an earlier and illegitimate (male?) child was not yet recognized, as shown in Part 4, but such a child would have no claim on the Swansey settlement. In any case, Peter complains that Swansey utterly refused to keep his promise to make the settlement and had remarried after Elizabeth's death.

 

As Peter has no documentary evidence, he cannot claim under Common Law and asks the Chancery Court to cause Swansey to be brought into court and made to testify to the truth. Bill PRO-PL 6112 No. 83

 


Worden's Past family association newsletter. Vol. XIV. No.3. rNov. 19931. Part 8, "More Worden Origins." George L. Bolton:

 

PRO-PL 6/8, No. 19, dated 30 August 1625

 

In this bill of complaint, Peter Worden I is on the receiving end of the complaint; i.e., the defendant. The plaintiff is one Ralph Eyves of Fishwick and straight-away, we see that this concems the family of Margaret Wall, Peter's wife. Ralph was father-in-law of William Wall, Margaret's eldest son by her first husband (see Part 1). At the date of the bill, 1625, Peter is referred to as "of Preston, yeoman," not necessarily an accurate description.

 

Ralph's complaint is that about 1613, Ralph Eyves and William Wall of Chingle Hall had become jointly bound to Peter, on William's behalf, in the sum of £40. The reason for Eaves being involved may be that, in 1613, William was still only 20 years old. The bill thus confirms that in 1613, Margaret's first family was still living at Chingle Hall. Eaves claims that he and Wall had each paid their share of £20 to Peter but had been negligent in getting a receipt. He further claims that Peter, for "his own unjust lucre," (personal gain) had, about August 1624, obtained a writ at the Court of Common Pleas at Lancaster against Eyves, and on the strength of this writ, had caused the doors of Eyves house in Fishwick to be "violently broke open in the night time and with like force entering into the bedroom and caused Eyves to be arrested and threatened with being carried away in his shirt without suffering him to apparell himself with his other clothes."

"In his extremity," Eyves was compelled to deliver "parcels of goods to the value of £50 or £60" to Peter ...

 

... September 1625 he would give himself up to the County Sheriff, against the writ. He also claims that Peter, once having got the goods, did not pursue the writ but used some of the goods and sold the remainder. To add insult to injury, he adds that Peter has now taken out a new writ against the original debt bond, this time in the Preston Borough Court. Finally, Eyves asks the Chancery Court (a higher court than the Preston Borough Court) to make Peter appear before it on oath and for the lower court to produce their records so that justice may be properly done.

 

At face value, this bill of complaint shows Peter up in a very bad light. We must remember that in this bill, like all others, we only see, in most cases, what the plaintiff... has told the attomey, and the exaggeration was, no doubt, the name of the game. Whatever the truth of the details quoted in his actions, we can only trust that justice was done. The outcome is, at present, unknown.

 

This particular bill of complaint was prepared by Alexander Rigby, Colonel Rigby of Civil War fame (Britain) and father of Alexander and Edward Rigby who prepared other bills mentioned in this series.

 

Worden's Past family association newsletter. Vol. XIV. No.4. rFeb 19941. "Peter Sues the Grices, 1616." George Bolton:

 

After the main work ont he Chancery documents was concluded (reported in More Worden Origins, Parts 1-8), I discussed the matter with Miss Barlow, and the upshot was that I asked her to examine two further documents (DL 1/266 and DL 1/270) which appeared to have potential for yielding further information.

 

This proved to be the case, although not of such startling significance as the main run. Nevertheless, they provided interest and information.

 

Readers will recall that about 1603 Peter I married Margaret, the widow of Anthony Wall, and that before her first marriage, she was the daughter of Thomas Grice of Warrington (who died in 1588). Margaret herself

 


died in early 1612 leaving Peter a widower. By the laws of the time when a wife died, her husband inherited her property, including any expectations unless that property was the subject of entail.

 

Now we know enough about Peter to recognize that he was not one to miss out on anything that was owed to him or that he thought could be established as a claim, and such a claim is what these bills in Chancery are about.

 

Peter is the sole plaintiff and Thomas Grice (Margaret's brother) the defendant on behalf of himself and several of his siblings. The case notes which are complicated, show the father, Thomas, had made an indenture by which all of his children, most of whom were quite young, were each to have the sum of 20 pounds as and when they attained 21 years. The money was to arise from the income from his premises, which we know was the Eagle Inn in Warrington.

 

The Grices tried to establish by technical quibbles that Peter was not entitled to this money, and amusingly (but in legal jargon) that in any case Margaret's father had "given her a greate marriage porcion far exceeding the sum to her appointed by the said assignment."

 

Anthony Wall and Margaret had always seemed satisfied with the portion during the 18 years or so of their marriage (that is, 1583 -160 1), and Margaret, during her widowhood, and Peter and Margaret likewise "until a little before her death." The document states that Margaret had died "intested," that is intestate, or without a will, and letters of administration had been granted to Peter. Peter states that eh is owed 40 pounds and the share for the children who died before reaching 21. The Grices refused to pay. The outcome of the case is unknown.

 

By calculation from the data, useful facts can be derived:

 

Margaret was bom between 1568 and 1572

She was married to Anthony wall between 1584 and 1587 She was aged, at the time, between 16 and 19

When she married Peter I, she was aged between 31 and 36 When Peter II was bom she was between 37 and 41

 

I am pleased to note that this does not conflicted with my earlier calculations on the subject.

 

(George Bolton, Source #708, Leyland, England, [May 1993])

 

Worden's Past family association newsletter, Vol. XV, No. I, rMay 19941. "The Feudal System Versus Peter's Mother," George Bolton:

 

Yet another instance has arisen of the potential that exists for information about the early Wardens being contained in the massive amount of documents in the Public Record Office in London.

 

I t has been revealed by perusal of a book by Philip Michael Worthington, hereafter abbreviated to PMW, entitled The Worthington Families of Medieval England, [pubL 1985] by Phillimore of Chichester, England ... This is a substantial book in which the author gives in carefully researched detail the story of a number of related families by the name of Worthington which originated from a place of that name in Lancashire, England.

 

Readers of my articles (esp. Ref. 1) will recall that Robert Worden, the father of Peter I, married into the

 


family of Worthington of Blains cough and this is one of the branches of the Worthington family which Philip Worthington describes in his book. Sure enough, in the chapter on that branch, he indicates Isabel, second daughter of Blains cough, as having married (bef. 1570), Robert Worden of Clayton. Itis clear that the author of the book had access to documents in the PRO in London and this has enabled him to discover facts about Isabel that Worden researchers (including myself) were unaware of, more especially for the period of her widowhood after 1580 when Robert Worden died.

 

These facts can be integrated into the Worden history and my present article is an augmented paraphrase of the relevant section of PMV's book to which (I)..................................................................... pay(s) acknowledgement.

 

The period of Robert Worden's life coincided with that in which the English medieval feudal system was increasingly falling into duskiest, superseded by more modem methods oflandholding. By the old system, all land was, in theory at least, owned by the King and let out to major landholders who, in tum, let it out to lesser holders, the process of "sub-infeudation." The occupiers held the land by knight's service, where originally they had to provide a specified number of armed knights for the King's service. Later, the service was commuted to a money payment. Homage (ritual acknowledgement) and many other services were demanded from the holder, only one of which need concem us here.

 

When a tenant died, the Lord to whom he owed homage, seized the land and demanded a fine or relief (a specified money payment) before he restored the land to the tenant's heir. If, however, the heir was under 21 years of age, the lord had right of wardship and marriage over the heir, and during his minority, the lord held the land, extracted the profits and used them to maintain and educate the heir, for whom he could also select a wife. Wardship was a saleable asset and in unscrupulous hands could be an injustice.

 

This was the position in which Isabel, wife of Robert Worden of Clayton, found herself on the 11 th of September 1580 when Robert, her husband, died. She was left with three sons, William, the heir being only 11 years old, James somewhat less and Peter (Peter I) the youngest, we estimate as being only about four years old. This was a serious matter for Isabel and it was not long before the lord of the manor was demanding his right of wardship over young William.

 

Robert Worden had held land in both Clayton and Leyland (adjacent manors) both of which had divided or multiple lordships, but it so happens that Sir Edmund Huddleston was the lord over both these portions of Clayton and Leyland where Robert held his land. The location of the Clayton land is firmly established as I have described earlier, and I believe but cannot yet prove that the Leyland land was immediately adjacent, just across the Worden brook, forming an ancient enclave.

 

PMW quotes in full a document in the Public Record Office (Ref. 2) where Sir Edmund and his wife, Dorothy, submitted a bill of complaint on 30 January 1583 to the Court of the Duchy of Lancaster Chamber in Westminster London (it may be recalled that Duchy cases had to be fought in London whereas Palatinate cases could be fought in Preston). After reciting the circumstances of the Wordens as described above, the plaintiffs described how they had seized the lands in question as well as the actual "bodie of the said William" claiming wardship thereby. But "certeyne deeds evidences charts and writings" which proved that the lands were held by knight service (see above) had "by casual means" come into the hands ofIsabel Worden (the widow), Richard Worthington (her brother), and a John Bannister (possibly her cousin).

 

Worse still, the three named had removed young William from the hands of the Huddlestons and hidden him, their reason being given that the lands were not held by knight service so the wardship was invalid. The plaintiff prayed that Isabel and the others should be brought to court to answer the charges. I suspect that Sir Edmund had brought a similar action about the lands a year earlier (Ref. 3) but the point is unimportant.

 


A couple of months later, Isabel Worden alone submitted a written answer to Westminster (sworn in Leyland) and presented to the court on 20 April 1583, in which she claims that the lands were hold in socage, not knight service. Socage is a non-military tenure where the tenant holds land by submitting himself to the lord for protection in return for fidelity.

 

It would seem to the present writer that the rights of these conflicting claims are somewhat uncertain. An inquisition Post Mortem on Robert Worden was taken at Leyland on 21 November 1584 (Ref. 4, reproduced in an early Wordens Past, Vol. 1, No.3, pg. 11) before a panel of jurors who say that the Clayton lands were held by the Huddlestons but by military service. the LP.M. was probably instigated by the Huddlestons and the decision above may well be the reason that when they repeated their claim later in 1586, they limited it to the Leyland lands alone (seven acres) because they felt more sure of these. Meanwhile, young William was getting older all the time and nearing his majority.

 

It may well be that the reason for the uncertainty about the nature of the tenure of the Worden's Clayton holding lay in its peculiar history. From about 1200 AD. it had been held in frankalmoign, that is, granted by Gerald de Clayton to the monks of Cockersand Abbey in return for prayers for his soul. For much, if not all of the time the Wordens had been the actual tenants of the land and when, in the early 16th century, the abbey had been dissolved, who is to say that the Wordens did not just sit tight regarding their land as an ancient freehold?

 

Back in 1583, an element almost of farce was taking place. In the same court, Isabel turned on her confederates and accused them of taking William away from his mother, moving him to Standish, then to Blainscough. I cannot help feeling all this is a smokescreen as also the other accusations of breach of trust and theft of corn, amusing though they are, but irrelevant.

 

Finally, Lord and Lady Huddleston pleaded that "they were strangers and lived far away," that the defendants had made unto themselves ;"secretleasesestaytes and conveyances not known to the plaintiffs" and thus, they were being denied both the profits and the lordship of the lands. The Huddlestons were, in fact, non-resident lords and lived in Sawston, Cambridge, having inherited the Leyland lands by marriage. Rather a sorry come­down for the Lord of the manor to have to pleased to the court in this fashion! As is so often the case, the final verdict is missing. I suspect the claim failed by default and passage of time and the Huddlestons heart may not have been in the matter.

 

It rather looks as if this was a case of "all's well that ends well" and certainly, young William, Peter's elder brother, went on to continue the main line of the Clayton Wordens.

 

When, in 1583, Robert Worthington and John Bannister rebutted Isabel's "allegations" the former man (her brother) made a very highly significant statement to the effect that Robert Worden, in 1575, five years before his death, had c40vised (conveyed by lease) the Leyland lands in question for a term of years to the said Richard (his brother-in-law).

 

In a further statement in 1587, Worthington elaborates on this. He says that, in 1575, Robert Worden was poor, aged and with little life expectancy and "having dyvers younge children unprovyded fore ... that they should be brought up in some honest sort ... and might have some honest portion towards their mariages and preferme1}ts." Thi_ mention of mariages leads me to think that Peter I had one or more sisters, a not unexpe,cted fact but one which has escaped the records until now.

 

The elabor<ttion mentioned above specifically confirms that the lands in the lease were the seven acres in Leyland_ndthat they were held by an entail. The lessee Richard Worthington, and we must renfetnber that

 


he was uncle to young William and all the other young children, including Peter, was to hold the lands for 21 years and at his discretion, was to use the profits for their education and bringing up and for their preferment in marriage.

 

Female children are not specifically mentioned but clearly, this last remark refers to the subject of dowries. Finally, for reasons which can only be surmised and it mussed be observed that the Worthing tons were a Roman Catholic family, he indicates that the lease has been reassigned to one Lawrence Howlker who is to use the profits for the children's benefit exactly as specified above and that this was, in fact, being done satisfactorily.

 

Not surprisingly, after 400 years have passed, some fine detail of the story is missing, but it is very gratifying that research done on a different family, the Worthingtons, has added something to our knowledge of the Worden family.

 

Source Acknowledgement: Reproduced by kind permission from The Worthingtons of Medieval England, by P.M. Worthington, published in 1985 by Phillimore & Co., Ltd., Chichester, West Sussex, England.

 

References:

1.             G.L.Bolton, "Peter Worden's Mother and Her Family,"Worden's Past, Vol. XI, No. 4,p. 723.

2.             PRO, Pleadings Duchy of Lancashire, DI 1/1251H8, DL 1/127/Wl, DL 1/1391H4.

3.             Record Commission, Ducatus Lancastriae, Part 4,24 Eliz (1581-2).

4. PRO. Inquisition Post Mortem. Robert Worden 21 Nov. 1584. Duchy of Lancashire, Chancery DL 7/14. Transcribed in Court of Wards.

 

(Srce #708, George L. Bolton, Leyland, England, Uun 1993])

 

Worden's Past family association newsletter. Vol. XV. No.2. rAug 19941. "More Worden Origins." George L. Bolton:

See this issue regarding towns and geography, taxation, and other data surrounding Peter Worden I and the Worthington family.

 

Worden's Past. Vol. XV. No.3, rNov 19941. "More Worden Origins," George L. Bolton:

Part 12

The family history ofIsabel Worthington, Peter Worden's mother, is well attested; indeed, it is probably the most well documented part of early Worden genealogy. Two of my articles on the Wordens refer in some detail to Isabel, her origins and such of her activities of which we have any evidence (Refs. 1 and 2).

 

In the first of these two contributions (W.P. page 723) I made the statement that no trace of the Manorial Hall of Blainscough, Isabel's birthplace, now exists. Although technically accurate, the statement is now well worth qualifying, in the interests of recording every fact which it is possible to draw out about the early Wordens.

 

In recent months, I have been reading in detail the excellent book by Philip Worthington on the Worthington families of medieval England (Ref. 3) to which I made extensive reference in Part 11 of "More Worden Origins." (N.B., by a kindness, I now possess my own copy.) On pages 3-4 the author makes a brief reference to the site of the old hall, and this fact, together with my renewed general interest in the Worthington families, prompted me to return to the site of the former Blainscough Hall. I trust that the information obtained will be of interest to the readers. On revisiting the site, I made arrangements to meet the present owner, Mr. Alan Hargreaves, from whom I received every consideration. Let me say immediately that at

 


Blainscough, there is now no remaining structure that Isabel would recognise as the house where she was born. However, the archaeological traces remaining are of interest in their own right, even without the Worden connection.

 

To recapitulate, Blainscough is an area of Coppull which, in turn, is part of Standish. Originally, in the hands of a family with the surname Blainscough, it came in the early 14th century into the hands of a branch of the Worthington Family, who by the normal process of early name formation, became the Worthing tons of Blainscough.

The estate, which was quite extensive, can best be described as a minor manor. Like all such manors, it had its manor house which, although we have now no trace of it, was substantial. I base this statement on the face that in 1666 (i.e., after Isabel's day), it returned 14 hearths to the Hearth Tax of that year, on a par with Clayton Hall near Peter Worden's birthplace. Like Clayton Hall, the Hall at Blainscough was a moated site, and traces of the moat can still be detected.

 

I reproduce a map of 1894 which gives a flavour of the site as it was at that date (see newsletter, this issue). Moats often date from the 12th-14th centuries and not all moats were defensive. Some were ornamental as well as practical, and some even may have been status symbols.

 

Typically, the house was built on a platform of clay soil some 1/4 to 11/2 acres in area (I estimate Blainscough to have been 3/4 acres) surrounded by banks holding water. There would be a causeway for access and in times of danger, the farm stock would be driven on to the platform for safety.

 

The records show that the Worthing tons had a private oratory (chapel) at Blainscough Hall, receiving a license form the Bishop of Lichfield in 1388 for that purpose. It is stated that this oratory was still in use in Isabel's day and may have been used for private baptisms. Itis not clear if it was within the old house or was a separate building. In either case, it does not now remain.

 

Now, there still is a Blainscough Hall in existence, where Alan Hargreaves lives, but it is not the house where Isabel was born and with which I feel sure Peter Worden was familiar. The reason is sad but simple.

 

The Worthingtons fell on bad times because of their religious and political views, and indeed, because of these facts, by the early 18th century, they fell into obscurity, having mortgaged and then sold the estate.

 

The new owners did not live in the old moated house, but built anew a little to the southeast of the old site, the square building marked on the sketch (see newsletter) by heavy shading. This present building gives a modem appearance, not (ca. 1920) surprisingly, as it has been almost destroyed by fire twice and only slight archeological traces of the original house (ca. 1740) can be detected. The history for the Worthingtons of Blainscough is packed with interest but it is no part of my brief to retain what has been covered so admirably by Philip Worthington, and I can only recommend any interested reader to consult his book. From this and several other sources, however, I would just like to quote two incidents:

 

The principal character of the family was, without doubt, the learned priest, Dr. Thomas Worthington, S.J., D.d., B.A. (1549-1622), Isabel's brother and Peter Worden's uncle. Trained on the Continent, his activities in England earned him banishment from the Kingdom back to France and elsewhere, where he was closely associated with Edmund Campion, the noted Jesuit who came to England in 1580 to attempt the conversion of England to the Roman Catholic faith and who, not surprisingly, was actively pursued by the authorities. Daringly, Campion visited Blainscough, a sympathetic house, and legend has it that he only escaped capture by the quick action of a maid who pushed him into a pond, convincing the pursuers that he was merely a 'fooL' A nice story, but to no avail, he was later captured and executed.

 


More of potential significance is the fact (Ref. 4) that Thomas Worthington rose to such eminence that in 1615 in Belgium, when an assembly of Roman dignitaries met to consider a commission from the Pope (Paul V) for the selection of an Archbishop of Canterbury, that is provided the Roman religion was restored in England, the Commission chose Dr. Thomas for the position. Needless to say, this state of affairs did not come about but if it had, I wonder what effect this would have had on the subsequent history of Peter Worden I, his nephew!

 

References:

1.         G.L. Bolton. "Peter Worden's Mother and Her Family," W.P. Vol. XI, No.4, page 722.

2.         G.L. Bolton. "The Feudal System vs. Peter's Mother," W.P. Vol. XV, No.1, page 1079.

3.         P.M. Worthington. "Worthington Families of Medieval England," Phillimore.

4.         Ibid, page 169.

 

(Srce #708, George L. Bolton, Leyland, England [Nov 1993])

 

Sources

Baines, History of Lancashire, ed. Harland [1868-1870], Vol. II, p. 242; Vol. III, p. 446,1836.

Bolton, George L., Worden's Past family association newsletters, Vol. VII, No.2; Vol. VII, No.3; Vol. VII, No.4; Vol. VIII, No.1; Vol. VIII, No.2; Vol. XI, No.2; Vol. XI, No.3 (includes sketch of Ann Worden house in Preston, England); Vol. XI, No.4; Vol. XII, No.1 - discussion on possible friendship between the Worden family and Standish family in England (of Myles Standish fame); Vol. XII, No.2; Vol. XII, No.4; Vol. XIII, No.1, May 1992; Vol. XIII, No.2 November 1992; Vol. XIV, No.1, May 1993; Vol. XIV, No. 2, Augustl993; Vol. XIV, No.4, Feb. 1994; Vol. XIV, No.3,              November 1993; Vol. XV, No.1, May 1994; Vol. XV, No.3, Nov. 1994.

Burk, Landed Gentry, Vol. IV, 330, [1863].

Burke, Sir Bemard, General Amwry of England, etc., [1884].

Cockayne, G.E., Complete Baronage, Vol. IV, [1904].

Dryden, Sir H., 1839, sketch of Ann Worden house, which appeared in Te. Smith, Records of the Parish

Church                   of Preston in Amoundemess, publ. Preston, 1892.

Fairbaim, Crests of the Families of Great Britain, etc., pub. Tuttle & Co., Rutland, VT, [1968].

Farington of Worden, Lanes. Records Office: DDF 158; DDF 1717-1718

Hewitson, Our Country Churches and Chapels, p. 43, [1872].

Hill, L., Gentlemen of Courage - Forward, Magnolia Publications, [1987].

Manuscript plans of Preston drawn by Doctor Richard Kuerden in circa 1684, Lancashire Record Office DDX 194:2; DDX 194:3 -- see Worden's Past family association newsletter, XI, No.2, Aug. 1990, p. 675

                for map of Preston Market Place in 1684, including location of Peter Worden's shop.

Palatine Chancery Court.

Preston Corporation Rental Book of 1670.

Records of Patricia e. Worden and Worden's Past family association newsletter.

Records of Donna L. Benedict.

Rivington Grammar School Register, 1615-1833, Lancashire Record Office, DDX 94/98, also DDX 94/94. "Visitation of Cheshire," Rec. Soc. Lanes. and Ches., Vol. 58, [1909].

Wilson, G.F., The Pilgrim Reader, Doubleday, N.Y., [1953].

Worden, Waite W., 8 Kings Court, Kings Close, Leyland, Preston, Lanes PR5 1SF, England (Member,

Worden                 Family Association - [1992]).

 

"More Worden Origins. A Question of Religions, Number 1 of some diverse thoughts on Worden Origins" George L. Bolton, Wardens Past family association newsletter. Vol. XV, No.4 Feb. [19951:

 


I have been asked by a member to give an opinion on the nature of the religious affiliation of Peter Worden I. Whilst doubting my competence to comment, I can at least, because of the nature of my own particular philosophy, stand outside the subject without a cause to plead.

 

Peter was born about 1576 in the middle of the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558-1603). By that time, the framework of the official English national religion, after trauma of the three preceding reigns, had (literally) become established. Protestant in nature, it differed from Roman Catholicism less than might generally be supposed, with the vital exception of allegiance to Rome. It has been observed that, indeed, the differences were less than the similarities.

 

It has to be said that there is no hard evidence about Peter's affiliation, and we can only look at his family and environmental background. Here we have a problem. We, in this country, used to have a radio personality, one Professor (genuine) Joad, who would have answered such a question, "It all depends on what you mean by the word Religion." Never was this more apt than during the lifetime of Peter's father Robert (1534-1580) when, with each change of monarch, the forms and observances of official religion were changed (and changed back again) with bewildering rapidity. Add to this the slowness of the methods of communication from Canterbury to a remote county Lancashire and the inertia and opposition to change on the part of the population, confusion must have reigned, with local churches having (or making) difficulty in keeping up with the latest instructions.

 

On his paternal side, there is no record of his immediate family being fined for recusancy (non-attendance at the Anglican Church services). Too much must not be read into this. It may bean they were "Church Catholics," avoiding fines by nominal unwilling attendance or, possibly, if of the Catholic persuasion, they were like so many in the area not vigorously pursued by the magis try who, in many cases, were of the self-same persuasion! However, there is evidence that the Worden family of Clayton who remained behind when Peter emigrated were of definite Roman tendency. For instance, Ellen, the widow of Peter's nephew, James, was listed as recusant in 1665, and there are other indications. .

 

On his mother's side, the Worthington family case is more clear. This family was strongly Roman in connection (although some members paid lip service to the established religion), giving sons to the priesthood and one member married into a family active at the national level in attempting to reintroduce the Roman religion into England.

 

We now know that Peter married Margaret, the widow of Anthony Wall of Preston. It seems generally accepted that the Walls were Roman in character, but this view may be colored by events and anecdotes of a later period, and there are some indications to the contrary, so it may be wise to defer judgement. Indeed, Anthony himself was of the merchant class in Preston who usually inclined to the opposite affiliation. In any case, we do not know what influence the religious opinions of Margaret would have had on Peter himself; probably very little! We also have the will of Margaret's father, Thomas Grice, which shows no evidence of Catholicism (wills often had a distinguishing characteristic in this respect).

 

Regrettably, the slight evidence from Peter's familial connections leaves the original question unanswered.

 

Turning to his environmental influence, it may be possible to draw certain inferences. His family home in Clayton lay in that diagonal swathe of strongly held Roman views which spread right across southwest Lancashire. The Lords of the Manor Clayton were of those views and so were many of their tenants.

 

When he entered into commercial activity in Preston to the north, he would certainly be exposed to a very different environment. Preston, at the beginning of the 17th century, was very much polarized into the

 


extremes of religious faith, Roman Catholicism (outside the established religion, of course) on the one hand, and the far right of Anglicanism, namely Puritanism and kindred sects on the other.

 

There is much evidence that the commercial elements in the town were strongly inclined to Puritan or other extreme refonning views and some of this evidence well may be relevant to our subject, this comes about as follows. The vicars of Preston parish church of the period in general leaned toward the dissenting side of Anglicanism. In this, they were rather aided and abetted by the diocesan authorities of the period, who in distinction from the authorities in the south of England, saw the preaching abilities of these Puritans as a counterblast to the prevalence of Roman Catholicism. We saw this in an earlier article in the case of Queens (Kings) Preachers.

 

The vicars did not lean far enough, apparently, for some of the more prosperous merchants of Preston. The vicar in 1621 was J ames Martin, already mentioned as a Kings Preacher. He was apparently slightly unhinged and was a confederate of John Lewis, of earlier notoriety. Perhaps unfairly in 1623, he was deprived of the benefice and spent the next ten years claiming that there was a "Puritan conspiracy" against him. The detail of his claims are not as important as the stated make-up of this "conspiracy" which included:

 

0Edmund Werden, a rich shopkeeper, brother to Anne (Werden) Jenkinson, who built the house in the square. Edmund was later Mayor of Preston, and I have shown that Peter had some undefined connection with these other Werdens.

 

0Roger Langton, draper and aulnager, for whom Peter acted as deputy for a long period. Langton was also a later Mayor.

 

0Seth Bushell and John Jameson, rich shopkeepers who acted as trustees for Peter Worden in a land deal concerning Chingle Hall.

 

It is clear that the above people and others were attempting to impose a fonn of religion in the parish of Preston even more radical than which was in vogue there. I prefer to see these people as radicals rather than specifically Puritan, often a tenn of abuse for people of refonning views. The tenn, Puritan, in any case, defies precise or simple definition.

 

The main conclusion from this episode is that the class of wealthy or middle class merchants in Preston of

which Peter was a member was "Puritan" in the main. This is in line with the national trend where this class was antagonistic,to the fiscal and political policies of a despotic monarchy, which tried to enforce religious policies to which the class was antagonistic. These policies lead to considerable numbers of Dissenters leaving the country and also eventually to the English Civil War.

 

The names I have selected from those persons claimed by Martin to be the "Purtian conspiracy" were persons of whom we have documentary proof that Peter Worden was their associate. It is obvious, therefore, that whatever Peter's religious or political views, they were not sufficiently antagonistic to those persons named to prevent such business associations taking place.

 

On the subject of Peter's religion, at the time of his emigration, I do not think we can go further without more evidence.

 

Once Peter had reached New England, can we deduce anything from the slight evidence available? His will is completely devoid of religious preamble and that of Peter II is not marked by any strong religious sentiments. We know that Peter II attended the meeting on the Lord's Day, but seem._ not always to have

 


given the service his full attention, which brought him to the notice of the authorities.

 

In conclusion, there is no clear evidence of any strong religious tendencies in the makeup of Peter Worden. Ifhe had, they have gone unrecorded in any documentation which has survived.

 

Sources Consulted

1.         H. Fishwick, History of the Parish of Preston, [1900].

2.         P. Sanster, A History of the Free Churches, Heinemann, [1983].

3.         R.c. Richardson, Puritanism in N.W. England, Manchester UP, [1972].

4.         W.W. Biggs, Intra. to the History of the Christian Church, Arnold, [1965].

 

Source #708, George L. Bolton, Leydon, England, [May 1993].

 

From "The Will of Peter Worden. Some Interpretations." Waite Warren Worden. Wordens Past family association newsletter, Vol. XV, No.4 Feb. 1995:

 

Those of us who are interested in Worden genealogy are particularly blessed by the existence of the recorded will of Peter Worden I dated 9 Feb 1638-39, which was entered for probate at a session of the General Court of Plymouth Colony on the following 5th of March. And, I would assume, most of us have read it from time to time in one or more of the following forms:

 

0 0 0

 

In the original handwriting of the Court Clerk (Ref. 1, see. p. 1108),

A typewritten transcript of the above, in the original spelling, or

A typewritten transcript using modem spelling (see WP, III, #3, pg. 90).

 

While a cursory reading of the will seems to present a fairly clear account of what Peter wished to provide, and to whom, there are some points of ambiguity which lend themselves to interpretations which, if correct, would clarify the intent of Peter.

 

1.

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

Spelling (u and v): The small u and v were used interchangeably as late as the 15th century (Ref. 2). But the custom was continued in the 17th Century Plymouth Colony records. In English dictionaries, the letters U and V were not given separate alphabetical listings until about 1800 (ref. 2). Thus, "sovereign" is spelled "souereign," "give" is "giue," "above" is "aboue."

 

Roman numerals: xiij = 14, and xxjth = 21st. The letter j was a comparatively late variant of the letter i either with, or without, the dot (ref. 2). In Roman numerals, the last or only i was often written as j. Frequently, I an_J were interchangeable, especially at the beginning of a word. Thus, John Jones would be lohn lones. For another example, see Mr. George Bolton's article concerning Ann Werden who married John Jenkinson, and the house they built in 1929 (ref. 3). Their initials carved over the door were I for John and A for Ann and I for Jenkinson.

 

"Patten": Peter identified himself as Peter Worden ofY armouth in New England in Plymouth Patten, which was a misspelling of Patent. In this case, it refers to land described in '1etters patent" granted to William Bradford, under the so-called "Warwick Patent," which was signed by Robert, Earl of Warwick. although the pilgrims disembarked from Mayflower in late Dec. 1620, a satisfactory patent

(one which prescribed boundaries) was not issued until 13 Jan 1629-30. (The original of this document, with its heavy seals, is on public display in the Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth, MA).

 

Grandchild: Peter made certain provisions for his "grandchild," without indicating whether it was

 


5.

 

6.

 

7.

 

8.

 

9.

 

a grandson or granddaughter. However, the grandchild is referred to by the masculine personal pronouns of him, he and his, leading to the logical conclusion that the grandchild was male.

 

John Lewis: Peter makes provision for someone named John Lewis and John. While it appears that John Lewis, John and grandchild may have been one and the same person, the text of the will does not so specify. It would have saved much confusion and conjecture in later years (centuries?) if Peter had said, "... my grandson, John Lewis." But, he did not, which has caused genealogists and researchers to wonder about the identity of the grandchild. However, the matter was finally resolved in 1992, when records were discovered indicating that Peter's daughter, Elizabeth, had born an illegitimate child (gender not specified), fathered by a cleric named John Lewis.

 

County of Lankester: Peter referred to his holding in the Towne of Clayton in the County of Lankester. Today the county is known as Lancashire.

 

Support of the grandchild: (a) Peter (II) is to "have the tuition of my grandchild untill he be at the age of one and twenty yeares ..." "Tuition" is used here in its original sense, meaning guardianship, rather than today's meaning of the cost of education. The word is derived from the Middle English "tuicion," from the Old French, from Latin "Tuitio" (protection (ref. 5 and 6). (b) Peter charges his son, Peter (II) to "fynd" (find) meaning to "supply or provide" the grandchild with "meate, drinke and cloathes," (c) after all, Peter II was the boy's uncle, thus a logical candidate to be his guardian and watch over him.

 

Age of the grandchild: Not specified but obviously less than 21 years of age. since provision was made for the last three years of the xxjth (21st) year, the grandchild was under 18 at the time.

 

Location of the grandchild: There has been conjecture that this grandchild lived elsewhere in North America, or perhaps was still in England. I t appears that he is right there in Yarmouth, and has been performing chores for his grandfather, who was Peter (II) to give to the grandchild such money as is due for the keeping of goats and calves "until this day." It appears that the boy has been caring for his grandfather's livestock for a certain wage, and that he was owed some wages at the time the will was made. Also, if Peter II is to provide the boy with "meate, drinke, and cloathes," and he is guardian, it seems they would have had to be in close proximity, one to the other (thus, probably in or near Yarmouth) for these responsibilities to be carried out.

 

Sources

1.             Plymouth Colony Records, 5 March 1638.

2.             Webster's New International Dictionary of the English Language, Second Edition, [1959], pp.

2753 and 2810.

"More about Ann Werden's House in Preston," George L. Bolton, Wardens Past family association newsletter, Vol. XI, [Nov 1990], pp. 701-702.

Peter Worden 1's Grandchildren by George L. Bolton, Wardens Past family association newsletter, Vol. XIII, No.2, [Aug 1992], pp. 858-868.

Webster, op cit., p. 2732.

ORIGINS, A Short Etyrrwlogical Dictionary of Modem English, Eric Partridge, Greenwich House, New York, [1983], p. 742.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5. 6.

 


Worden's Past family association newsletter, Vol. XVI, No. 1, rMay 19951. "More Worden Origins," George L. Bolton:

 

Peter Worden's Schooldays

Waming: This is not a factual account of the subject ... (however it is typical of the kind of education his social class received during his lifetime).

 

Peter was an Elizabethan and the mainstay of the education of the period was the Free Grammar School...the sons of the gentry and the yeomen sat down together to be educated.

 

Grammar schools had one principal objective - the teaching of the Latin language; hence, the name. Latin was the language of scripture and all classicalleaming and the reformed establishment looked to these schools to provide future champions to confute Catholic scholars in disputation. The fact that Latin was also the language of the new sciences and commerce was perhaps incidental to the intention. Many of these schools were founded in the 16th century or earlier and many were associated with chantries which were set up, often as bequests or endowments by a local magnate within the local parish church. These chantries were to provide prayers for the benefactors and his family. Where a school was included, the chantry priest often taught there in his spare time, the school actually being within the church building. Those founded before the suppression of the chantries in ca. 1545 required refounding, and many were.

 

... Leyland Free Grammar School was less than two miles from Peter's home in Clayton ... It had its origin in the foundation in 1524 by Sir Henry Farington of a chantry altar to St. Nicholas in the parish church of St. Andrew "to celebrate there for the souls of him and his antecessors." There is no specific mention of a school but in 1546, it was found that Thurstan Taylor was the incumbent of the foundation "by which foundation the incumbents are bound to keep one Free Gramar Scoyle in the church beforesayde." The chantry was abolished in 1546 but the school survived. It is thus clear that the school was within the church but this was forbidden by a statute of 1595 ...

 

... In school, the master sat on a dais or high chair at one end and the pupils in benches down the sides. There mayor may not have been an usher or under master ... Masters were of varying standard, the essential requirement was religious orthodoxy... they might be a priest ... and if the school was fortunate, could have been a graduate from one of the universities. All masters needed a certificate from authorities to teach. Local origin and age over 26 were desirable features. An usher was subservient to the master. As a salary, £20 per annum was typical for a small school with some perquisites and possibly a house ...

 

... Entrance was usually at about age seven to nine years. Grammar schools "were not meant for teaching Absays (ABC)" and pupils were expected to be proficient in reading and writing before entry. They were normally, provided their ability, ready for university at age 15 years, but of course actual university entrants would be in a minority ...

 

... The pupil was required to provide paper, pens, ink, and wax candles for illumination on dark days. Pencils ... did not come into use until 1630-40. Strangely, slates were not used until later. All written work used home made ink ... pens were cut from quill feathers by means of a penknife or could be purchased ready cut. Paper was expensive and a principal item of expenditure.

 

... School hours were long, perhaps an 11 hour day with breaks for meals, and holidays were limited. Discipline was strict with emphasis on manners, behavior and appearance. Punishment was severe but there is evidence of small rewards when eamed ...

 


... I do not feel that the Eli;abethan school boy is to be envied. [Girls were educated at home, usually only in fine sewing, cooking, manners, and such _ they were usually illiterate, unless taught by parents or a hired tutor.]

 

(The article continues with a description of schools in the 16th century.)

 


EARLY VIORDENS (File under Peter Worden I)

 

From "The Wardens of Preston, Lancashire, England," George L. Bolton, '.Vorden's Past family association newsletter, Vol. XII, No.3, rNov 19911:

 

Readers of any of my previous articles on the origins and history of Peter Worden will have seen frequent mention of the town of Preston, Lancashire and noted that there were other persons resident there with the surname which of such interest to us all. Because of the unique nature of the name, it is certain that its early representatives in Preston were from families who had originated in the hamlet of Worden, only five miles away. In Preston, the name was usually, but by no means universally, spelled as \Verden and this is the version I shall use here, except in the earliest references (one of which was Weyrden which may give a clue as to how the name was pronounced).

 

As I have shown, Peter Worden of Clayton had close links with the \YJ erdens of Preston, but I have never been able to demonstrate a near familial relationship between Peter and the latter. However, I feel that an account of the Preston family may be of interest and indeed it is not beyond the realms of possibility that at some later date members of that family emigrated to america, and these notes may be of interest on that account.

 

I must emphasize that little of this article is based on original research on my part, but it is a collation of known information, mainly from the printed works of nineteenth century Preston historians, to whose splendid publications we are greatly indebted. I do not think such a collation of Werden evidences has been attempted previously.

 

EARLY MENTI ON S

For the early period, the Preston Guild Rolls are the only source of information and in them we see mention

in 1459 of a William Wirden who as an In-Burgess (i.e., resident) paid four shillings as an admission fine (fee) to the Guild, no mean sum for the period. The subsequent Guild Rolls are missing but in 1542, there is mention of John, son of William Werden (probably a descendant), and also an Anthony Werden. In passing, we note that in 1542 we see mention, also as Foreign Burgesses (non-resident), of the Wordens of Clayton.

 

In the 1562 Guild, the same John as an Alderman (a member of the Borough Council, next in dignity to the Mayor) registered, together with his five sons. From then on, it is possible to construct a reliable pedigree down to the late 17th century and this I have set out separately. One of these sons was James Werden, and I regard him as the key figure at the end of the 16th century so far as our particular interests are concerned. We must remember that all this particular generation of Preston Werdens would be known intimately to Peter Worden for reasons which I have detailed in earlier articles.

 

TAMES WERDEN (? - 1607)

James, third son of Alderman John Werden, resident and Burgess of Preston, was a mercer, that is, a dealer in textile materials such as fine cloths of silk and other costly materials. He could well, also, have been a small capitalist, buying raw materials and putting them with outwo_kers for making up and trading with the finished products.

 

There is evidence that he was a successful businessman. Somewhere about 1585, he married Elizabeth, daughter of Edmund Lemon, also a successful businessman in the same trade. James had a house and garden in Fishergate, the main street of Preston, and here the couple had first of all five daughters between about 1586 and 1593, followed in 1595 by a son, Edmund, of whom more in the next section of this essay.

 


His position enabled at least three of the daughters to marry well: Ellen to Matthew French, Rector of North Meals; Jennet, first to John Chorley and then to Thurstan Briars; and Anne, first to John Jenkinson and then to Henry Fleetwood. I have already written on this matter (see WP, VoL VIII, No.2, p. 395; VoL X No.2, p. 583; and VoL XI, No.3, p. 698) but I take this opportunity of reiterating that Anne was most definitely the daughter of the above James and not of our Peter Worden as stated in a printed pedigree.

 

I would mention that James had a brother, Richard, also a mercer, who was associated with our Peter in connection with the will of Matthew French.

 

James Werden died 18 Dec. 1607 leaving his widow and five daughters and a son all under 21, and we have details of his will and his inquisition post mortem (i.e., details of his property).

 

EDMUND WERDEN (1595 - C. 1662):

Edmund, aged 12 on his father's death, was left forty shillings a year for his education and maintenance. One can imagine that with a mother and five relatively young sisters, he could have been rather spoiled, but anyhow, he was married at the age of24 to Elizabeth Sudell from another prosperous family in the town. He went on to have eight children as shown in the genealogical table herewith, but as they really belong to the middle and late 17th century, no further biographical details will be given of these children.

 

Edmund continued the trade of mercer carried on by his father, James, from the same premises. In 1628, the Mayor and Council of Preston, being somewhat alarmed at the number of unregistered persons who were dealing in the same of textile and other materials in the town, set up "a Companie of Ffraternitie called Wardens and Companie of Drapers, Mercers, Salters, Ironmongers, and Haberdashers." In effect, this was to create a monopoly of trade in all these items for townsmen who had been properly apprenticed and registered and to exclude the others.

 

THE CIVIL WAR AND PRESTON

 

In mid-1642, England had drifted toward the armed conflict between Royalists and Parliamentarians (later referred to as Cavaliers and Roundheads) , which was the First Civil War. The English Civil War as a complex affair, both for the participants and for subsequent historians. Factors which influenced loyalty to a particular cause, either King or Parliament, included Roman Catholicism versus Protestantism, Gentry versus Trade and general political attitude. In a town such as Preston, therefore, there were opposing loyalties. The northwest, in general, had strong Royalist tendencies, and in fact, the town had become a focus for Royalist sympathizers. However the administration, that is, the Aldermen and Council, were for the Parliament... none more so than Mr. Mayor, Edmund Werden. It is difficult to see how a coherent defense of Preston (which was attacked in turn by both Parliament and Royalist forces) could be organized and the evidence is that it could not because it fell easily in both cases.

 

It is necessary to mention here the proposed successor to Edmund Werden as Mayor, one Adam Mort, who by his marriage into the Catholic and Royalist Tildesley family was a surprising choice as Mayor elect in late 1642. It is sometimes stated that he did take up the office, but he was far too busy in his capacity of Royalist Commissioner of Array (that is, recruiting officer) to take his civic duties seriously. He was, therefore, fined 100 marks (over £66) for his contumacy. Now, there was some background to this because Mr. Tildesley was heard to remark that Edmund Werden had threatened to throw him (i.e., Mr. T), into prison and if so "he would this day have pulled the prison down and Mr. Mayor's (i.e, Edmund's) house would be set on fire."

 

By February 1643, Parliamentary forces were at the gates of Preston, obviously regarded as a Royalist town, whatever its mixed sympathies. It was poorly defensible and probably with the help of treachery, two hours

 


His position enabled at least three of the daughters to marry well: Ellen to Matthew French, Rector of North Meols; Jennet, first to John Chorley and then to Thurstan Briars; and Anne, first to John Jenkinson and then to Henry Fleetwood. I have already written on this matter (see WP, VoL VIII, No.2, p. 395; VoL X No.2, p. 583; and VoL XI, No.3, p. 698) but I take this opportunity of reiterating that Anne was most definitely the daughter of the above James and not of our Peter Worden as stated in a printed pedigree.

 

I would mention that James had a brother, Richard, also a mercer, who was associated with our Peter in connection with the will of Matthew French.

 

James Werden died 18 Dec. 1607 leaving his widow and five daughters and a son all under 21, and we have details of his will and his inquisition post mortem (i.e., details of his property).

 

EDMUND WERDEN (1595 - C. 1662):

Edmund, aged 12 on his father's death, was left forty shillings a year for his education and maintenance. One can imagine that with a mother and five relatively young sisters, he could have been rather spoiled, but anyhow, he was manied at the age of24 to Elizabeth Sudell from another prosperous family in the town. He went on to have eight children as shown in the genealogical table herewith, but as they really belong to the middle and late 17th century, no further biographical details will be given of these children.

 

Edmund continued the trade of mercer carried on by his father, James, from the same premises. In 1628, the Mayor and Council of Preston, being somewhat alanned at the number of unregistered persons who were dealing in the same of textile and other materials in the town, set up "a Companie of Hraternitie called Wardens and Companie of Drapers, Mercers, Salters, lronmongers, and Haberdashers." In effect, this was to create a monopoly of trade in all these items for townsmen who had been properly apprenticed and registered and to exclude the others.

 

THE CIVIL WAR AND PRESTON

 

In mid-1642, England had drifted toward the anned conflict between Royalists and Parliamentarians (later referred to as Cavaliers and Roundheads), which was the First Civil War. The English Civil War as a

complex affair, both for the participants and for subsequent historians. Factors which influenced loyalty to a particular cause, either King or Parliament, included Roman Catholicism versus Protestantism, Gentry versus Trade and general political attitude. In a town such as Preston, therefore, there were opposing loyalties. The northwest, in general, had strong Royalist tendencies, and in fact, the town had become a focus for Royalist sympathizers. However the administration, that is, the Aldennen and Council, were for the Parliament... none more so than Mr. Mayor, Edmund Werden. It is difficult to see how a coherent defense of Preston (which was attacked in turn by both Parliament and Royalist forces) could be organized and the evidence is that it could not because it fell easily in both cases.

 

I t is necessary to mention here the proposed successor to Edmund Werden as Mayor, one Adam Mort, who by his marriage into the Catholic and Royalist Tildesley family was a surprising choice as Mayor elect in late 1642. It is sometimes stated that he did take up the office, but he was far too busy in his capacity of Royalist Commissioner of Array (that is, recruiting officer) to take his civic duties seriously. He was, therefore, fined 100 marks (over £66) for his contumacy. Now, there was some background to this because Mr. Tildesley was heard to remark that Edmund Werden had threatened to throw him (i.e., Mr. T.), into prison and if so "he would this day have pulled the prison down and Mr. Mayor's (i.e, Edmund's) house would be set on fire."

 

By February 1643, Parliamentary forces were at the gates of Preston, obviously regarded as a Royalist town, whatever its mixed sympathies. It was poorly defensible and probably with the help of treachery, two hours

 


hand-to-hand fighting with sword and pike sufficed to capture the town. In this fighting, Adam Mort, the Mayor elect, and his son were killed, so the succession was thus settled. Edmund Werden was prevailed upon to continue in office for a second year, being given guarantees against any problems which might arise. The victors soon turned to plunder in the town.

 

The Royalist tide offortune then turned and five weeks later, on March 20th, the Earl of Derby and 4600 men invested the town and demanded its surrender, a demand which was spiritedly refused by Mayor Edmund Werden. To no avail, although the defenses had been strengthened, this time it took only one hour for the Royalists to recapture it. Lord Derby permitted his troops in turn to plunder and we find that one of his commanders, Mr. Tildesley (1), "was much busied about Mr. Edmund Werden's house in that way." Many of the country people assembled in Preston, crying "God save eh king and the Earl of Derby," though nationwide, the Parliamentary forces triumphed eventually until the Restoration of the Monarchy in Charles II in 1660.

 

However, Edmund survived all these vicissitudes and went on to be Mayor again in 1649 and a fourth time in the 63rd year of his age in 1657. He was still living in 1662 Guild Year (his fourth Guild), but died soon after.

 

POSTSCRIPT

 

It may be of interest to note that the next Preston Guild will take place in 1992, after the usual 20 year interval.

 

Sources

1.             W.A. Abram, Menwrials of the Preston Guilds, pub. G. Toulmin, Preston, [1882, reprinted 1971].

2.             W. DobsonandJ. Harland, A History of Preston Guild, publ.Dobson, Preston, [1862, reprinted 1971].

3.             H. Fishwick, History of the Parish of Preston, [1900].

4.             HW. Clemeshaw, History of the Parish of Preston in Anwunderness, [1912].

5.             A.J. Berry, Proud Prestons Story, [1928].

6.             W.A.Abram, ed., Rolls of Burgesses at the Guild Merchant 1397-1682, Rec. Soc. Lans. and Ches., Vol.

                9, [1884].                                                                                                                                                                             >

The Registers of the Parish Church of Preston, 1611-1635, Lancashire Parish Register Society, V 01. 48_

 

7.

 

Source #708, Copyright by George L. Bolton, Leyland, England, [Mar 1991].

 

THE WERDENS OF PRESTON

William f. 1459

     /

William f. 1542

     /

John d. 1585 and Anthony f. 1542

/

William d. ante 1602, had a son John f. 1622 Thurstond.1613

Henry f. 1582

Richard f. 1607, had sons Thomas and Robert

James, d. 1607, m. Elizabeth, dau. of Edmund Lemon, d. 1609

/

Ellen

Jennet

 


Anne

Margaret

Milly

Edmund, b. 1595, d. c. 1662, m. Elizabeth Sude1l1619

/

James\ b. 1623, d. infancy

HenrY,f. _(542, had Edmund, James f. 1682, John f. 1682 James, b. 1_26, f. 1642

John, b. 1630) had Henry f. 1682, William f. 1682 Thomas, b. 1662, had richard f. 1682

Mary

Elizabeth

 

(f. - li'>jng)

 


PETER WORDEN II

 

b. ca. 1609 Clayton, Lancaster, England d. 11 Jan 1680

bur. East Dennis, Bamstable, MA

m. England

 

Mary

d. 25 Mar 1687

 

Mary's will is found in Mayflower Descendants, Vol. 3, p. 201.

 

Supposedly, he also married several wives, but it appears that these could be repeats of the same woman or two women, as they all had the first name, Mary.

 

9Jan1679

 

Wrote his will.

 

29Ju11660

 

Wrote codicil to will.

 

3Mar 1681

 

,,'

Will was proved. Inventory included Ifhouse and land, money in tIl:

England and not knowing what it may be worth ...If

 

Sources

Records of Ruth Ipson.

Patricia C. Worden and the Worden's PG5t family association newsletter.

 


PETER WORDEN ill

B. 1668, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA; d. 18 Nov 1732, Warwick, Kent, RI; m. 20 Feb 1693, Mary Holley, b. 16 Feb 1665, Sandwich, Barnstable, MA; d. 1733, Warwick, Kent, RI. Peter and Mary were first cousins.

Mary Holley was the daughter ofJoseph Holley, Jr., b. England, d. 1692; m. 11 May 1657, Sandwich, Barnstable, MA, Mary Hull, b. 16 Feb 1645; d. bef. 1692. She was probably the daughter of Capt. Tristam Hull and his wife, Blanche ( ).

[See notes for more on HaoUey, AUen and Hull families.]

 

VI.

 

1697 -1706

 

1705

 

1713

 

1720

 

Farmed at Rodman Lands, Shawcatuck, So. Kingston, RI

 

Purchased land at Westerly, Washington, RI

 

Purchased more land at Westerly

 

Gave land at Westerly to his sons

 

1668 British East India Company gains control of Bombay; William Penn writes "Sandy Foundation Shaken," and questions the doctrine of Trinity; Rembrandt paints "Return of the Prodigal Son"; Robert Hooke writes "Discourse on Earthquakes"; Isaac Newton constructs a reflecting telescope; First accurate description of red corpuscles by Antony van Leeuwenhoek.

 

Children of Joseph Holley. Jr. and his wife. Mary Hull:

1.         Joseph Holley III, b. 1662; m. 1693, Anne Jennings.

2.         Sarah Holley, b. 25 Apr 1664; m. Matthew Allen, a cousin.

3.         Mary Holley, b.16 Feb 1665, Sandwich, Barnstable, MA; d.1733, Warwick, Kent,

RI; m. 20 Feb 1693, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA, Peter Worden ill, b. 1668, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA; d. 18 Nov 1732, Warwick, Kent, RI.

John Holley, b. 1667-68; d. 1745, Charles town, Washington, RI; m. Hopestill Worden, his first cousin.

Hannah Holley, b. 1 Mar 1667; m. 1700, South Kingston, Wakefield, RI, Ephraim ( ).

Rose Holley, b. ca. 1673; d. 1740; m. 16907-98, Samuel Worden II, b. ca. 1670, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA; d. 2 Sep 172 7, her first cousin.

Elizabeth Holley, b, 5 Sep 1672.

Samuel Holley, b. ca. 1676, m. Hannah Gardiner.

Benjamin Holley, b. ca. 1678, m. Penelope T ash of Black Island.

 

4.

 

5.

 

6.

 

7. 8. 9.

 

Children of Peter Worden III and his wife. Mary Holley:

1.             Judah Worden, b. ca. 1695; d. 9 Dec 1726; m. 2 Dec 1725, Rebecca Prentice.

2.             Peter Worden IV, b. 1697, RI; d. 1745, Westerly, Washington, RI; m. 26 May 1720,

Westerly, Rebecca Richmond, b. 23 May 1689, Kingston, Wakefield, RI. She was the daughter of John and Elizabeth ( ) Richmond.

Mary Worden.

 

3.

 

Sources

Records of Patricia C. Worden.

Worden's Past family association newsletter.

 


JOSEPH HOLLEY, JR.

 

b. prob. England

m. 11 May 1657 Sandwich, MA d.1692

 

Mary Hull

b. 16 Feb 1645 d. bef. 1692

 

Mary was the daughter of Capt. T ristam Hull and his wife Blanche. (McFarlane)

 

Joseph left no will when he died.

 

1647

 

Joseph was in his late teens when his father died, this year. He appears to have taken his father's place in the community within a short time, serving on the same committee his father had, one concemed with subdividing the common meadow lands so as to provide adequate grazing for all sheep and cattle. (McFarlane)

 

3May1670

 

Joseph was constable.

 

1675

 

On the list of freemen.

 

1678

 

Again on the list of freemen.

 

Sources

Bowden, James, The History of the Society of Friends in America, [1850], Vol. I, pp. 145--­

Records of Carol Robinson Casey.

Clark, Bertha, Sandwich Archives & Historical Center, MS, Sandwich, MA, [1955].

Genealogical Magazine ofN.]., Uan. 1941], Vol. 16, No.1, pp. 1-5.

Jones, Rufus, The Quakers in the American Colonies.

Mayflower Descendants, Vol. 14, p. 167; Vol. 16, p. 60; Vol. 18, p. 137.

McFarlane, Sally, "Hopes till Holley and the Related Families of Holley, Allen and Hull," Worden's Past newsletter, Vol. XI, No.2, Aug. 1990.

NEHG Register, Vol. 46, p. 186; Vol. 97, p. 330.

Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 4, p. 88.

Sandwich Quaker Records.

Records of Kenneth Roebuck, Wakefield, R.I.

Records of Marjorie Schunke.

Vital Records of Sandwich, Mass.

 


REV. JOSEPH HULL

 

b. 31 Mar 1594 Crewkeme, Somerset, Eng.

 

HULL, HOLLEY, and ALLEN FAMILIES

 

The lines, with children, are repeated here, to give the reader an indication of how often these families intermarried. It is not considered wise (or even legal, in most states today) to marry a first cousin, yet the Wedgwood, Darwin and Huxley families of England intermarried, first cousins, for generations, and produced generation after generation of geniuses, including Aldous Huxley, Charles Darwin and the family which began the Wedgwoodchinacompany. These families, and those of the Holley, Allen and Hull families, seem to have not had many "bad" genes which could cause problems.

A chart follows these notes, to help the reader follow the lines more easily.

 

Rose Allen was the daughter of George Allen, who d. 1649, Sandwich, Bamstable, MA. Rose Allen m. 2) William Newland.

 

Children of George Allen and his wife. name unknown:

1.         Rose Allen, m. Joseph Holley, Sr.

2.         Ralph Allen.

3.         William Allen.

4.         Matthew Allen.

 

Rose Allen m. Joseph Holley, Sr.

 

Children of Rose (Allen) and Toseph Holley. Sr.:

1.         Joseph Holley, Jr., b. England; d. 1692; m. 1 May 1657, Sandwich, Bamstable, MA, Mary

Hull, b. 6 Feb 1645; d. bef.1692. She was probably the daughter of Capt. Tristram Hull and his wife, Blanche ( ).

Mary Holley, d. 12 Jul 1703, Woodbridge, Middlesex, NJ; m. Nov 1662, Sandwich, Bamstable, MA, Nathaniel FitzRandolphlFitzRandall.

Sarah Holley, d. 1575-80, m. Joseph Allen. Joseph was her first cousin, the son of Ralph Allen and grandson of George Allen. He m. 2) Sarah Hull, probably the daughter of Capt. T ristam and Blanche Hull.

Hopestill Holley, b. 1645-46, Sandwich, Bamstable, MA; d. 13 Sep 1715, Stonington, New London, Ct; m. bef. May 1665, Yarmouth, Bamstable, MA., Dr. Samuel Worden, b. ca.

. 1646, East Dennis, Bamstable, MA; d. 26 Aug 1716, Stonington, New London, CT; bur. Wequetequoc Cemetery. Samuel Worden m. 2) Frances West.

Experience Holley, m. 9 Jan 1668, John Goodspeed of Bamstable, MA.

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5.

 

Children of Rose Allen and William Newland:

1.         Mercy Newland, b. 16 Apr 1649; m. William Edwards.

2.         Rose Newland, m. Joseph Buch.

3.         Elizabeth Newland, d. 4 Sep 1658.

 

Hopestill Holley m. Dr. Samuel Worden.

 

Children of Dr. Samuel and Hopestill (Holley) Worden:

1.             Peter Worden ill, b. 1668, Yarmouth, Bamstable, MA; d. 18 Nov 1732, Warwick, Kent, RI;

 


2.

 

m. 20 Feb 1693, Mary Holley, b. 16 Feb 1665, Sandwich, Barnstable, MA; d. 1733, Warwick, Kent, RI.

Samuel Worden II, b.ca.1670, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA; d.2 Sep 1727; m.1697-98,Rose t1olley,b.ca. 1673;d. 1740.

Dr. Isaac Worden, b. 1673, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA; d. 1718; m. 1695, Rebekah ( ). Dr. Thomas Worden, b. 1675, Barnstable Co., MA; d. 1 Jun 1759; m. 9 Dec 1708, Sarah Butler.

Dr. Nathaniel Worden, b. ca. 1679, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA; d. 1738; m. 1706-07, Margaret ( ).

Mary Worden, b. ca. 1680; d. bef. 1728; m. 1697, Daniel Wilcox.

t1opestill Worden, m. John t1olloway.

Rose Worden, m. Richard Partelow,Jr.

 

3. 4.

 

5.

 

6. 7. 8.

 

Joseph Holley, Jr. m. Mary Hull.

 

Children of Joseph t1olley. Jr. and his wife, Mary t1ull:

1.             Joseph t1olley III, b. 1662; m. 1693, Anne Jennings.

2.             Sarah t1olley, b. 25 Apr 1664; m. Matthew Allen, a cousin.

3.             Mary Holley, b. 16 Feb 1665, Sandwich, Barnstable, MA; d. 1733, Warwick, Kent, RI; m.

20 Feb 1693, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA, Peter Worden ill, b.1668, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA; d. 18 Nov 1732, Warwick, Kent, RI.

John t1olley, b. 1667-68; d. 1745, Charlestown, Washington, RI; m. t1opestill Worden, his first cousin.

t1annah t1olley, b. 1 Mar 1667; m. 1700, South Kingston, Wakefield, RI, Ephraim ( ). Rose t1olley, b. ca. 1673; d. 1740; m. 16907 -98, Samuel Worden II, b. ca. 1670, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA; d. 2 Sep 172 7, her first cousin.

Elizabeth t1olley, b, 5 Sep 1672.

Samuel t1olley, b. ca. 1676, m. t1annah Gardiner.

Benjamin t1olley, b. ca. 1678, m. Penelope Tosh of Black Island.

 

4.

 

5. 6.

 

7. 8. 9.

 

Mary Holley m. Peter Worden ill.

 

Children of Peter Worden III and his wife. Mary t1olley:

1.             Judah Worden, b. ca. 1695; d. 9 Dec 1726; m. 2 Dec 1725, Rebecca Prentice.

2.             Peter Worden IV, b. 1697, RI; d. 1745, Westerly, Washington, RI; m. 26 May 1720,

Westerly, Rebecca Richmond, b. 23 May 1689, Kingston, Wakefield, RI. She was the daughter of John and Elizabeth ( ) Richmond.

Mary Worden

 

3.

 

'1-Iopestill t1olley Worden and the Related Families oft1olley. Allen and t1ul1," by Sally Macfarlane, Worden's Past family association newsletter, VoL XI. No.2, Nov. 1990:

 

One of the most interesting and colorful of our ancestors was the Rev. Joseph t1ull, grandfather of Mary t1ull who married Joseph t1olley,Jr. It was the three children of Mary t1ull andJosepht1olley,Jr., you remember, who married their first cousins, the three Worden siblings, children of Dr. Samuel Worden and his wife, t1opestill t1olley. The Rev. Joseph t1ull is the grandfather to all of us who are descended from Peter Worden III, Samuel Worden II, and t1opestill Worden t1olley.

The Rev. Joseph t1ull graduated from Oxford University in 1614. t1e organized a group of 106 persons, including 21 families, who came to America in 1635. t1e was a founder of the town of Barnstable,

 


Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. He was a well known preacher, opposed by Governor Winthrop and the authorities for his moderate views, causing him to move several times, even back to England for a period of time. He died at the age of 71 on a little island off the coast of New Hampshire in 1665.

The Reverand Joseph Hull was ham March 31, 1594 in Crewkeme in the southem part of Somerset, England. He entered St. Mary's Hall, Oxford, on May 22, 1612 at the age of 17 and received his B.A. Degree on November 14, 1614. He then studied theology under his brother, the Rev. William Hull, for five years. William was vicar at Colyton, a markaet town in Devonshire about 15 miles southwest of Crewkeme. Joseph served as teacher and curate at Colyton during those five years and then, on April 4, 1621, he became rector at Northleigh, a village four miles northwest of Colyton, in the Exeter diocese, staying there eleven years. He evidently found himself in disagreement with the ecclesiastical authorities and, as the records show, he voluntarily resigned his rectorship.

The Rev. Joseph Hull moved with his family back to the Crewkeme area an there he gathered a company of 106 persons, including 21 families, who on March 20, 1635, sailed with him from Weymouth Harbor, England, for New England. The list of passengers was found in 1871 and includes Joseph Hull, age 40, his second wife Agnes, age 25, seven of his children, including our ancestor, his son Tristram Hull, then age eleven, and three of his servants. About seven weeks later, on May 6, 1635, Hull's Company reached Boston. They settled in Wessaguscus, which they rechristened Weymouth, after the town in England from which they had sailed.

"Mr. Hull," writes a biographer, "was a magistrate and member of the General Court of Massachusetts Bay Colony, as well as minister of Weymouth. He, however, was in antagonism to the Boston Puritanical Party, retaining his attachment for the old establishment. He was the political and religious opponent of Govemer Winthrop."

Joseph Hull was an Episcopalian with moderate Puritan views and when his moderation became unpopular in Weymouth, he moved in 1639 to the Old Colony of Plymouth and was one of the founders of Bamstable, Mass., on Cape Cod, which the Indians called Mattakeese. Col. Weygant, when he compiled The Hull Family in America in 1913, wrote that the rock was still standing in the middle of the highway from which Mr. Hull preached, surrounded by his armed parishioners.

Unfortunately, Plymouth Colony was not much more congenial for a man of Hull's political and religious sentiments than was the Massachusetts Bay Colony. The Separatist party increased, the beginning of the civil war in England had cut off immigration in 1639, and Mr. Hull and his friends were left in a hopeless minority.

Joseph Hull soon removed to the Episcopal Colony of Sir Ferdinando Gorges in Maine and became minister in what is now York, Maine. His territory included the Isles of Shoals, off the coast of what is now New Hampshire. He was there for fourteen years, until 1653, when the Massachusetts Bay Colony subjected Maine to its jurisdiction and Hull again felt the power of his old enemies. A sound Puritan preacher was sent to supersede him. Shortly afterwards, the Rev. Joseph Hull retumed to England and was arector of a church

in Launceston, Comwall, and then at St. Burien in Comwall, near Lands End. His children, however, all stayed in America, married here and settled here.

With the end of Cromwell's dictatorship and the restoration of the monarchy under Charles II, Hull evidently felt it wise for him to retum to America, and in 1662 he went to Oyster River (now Durham, NH) and then to the Isles of Shoals, where he died on November 19, 1665.

Joseph Hull was married twice. His first wife, Joanna, whose sumame may have been Coffin, died in England shortly after giving birth to their seventh child, Dorothy. He married second, Agnes, before immigrating to America, and with her had an additional seven children.

The Rev. Joseph Hull was a conformist and remained within the pale of the church, obedient to authority. In New England, he tried to hold to a middle course, but failing this, after repeated attempts, finally moved to a province where he was fre to practice and profess as best suited his conscience. Wrote his biographer, "In habit he was scholarly, in temperament religious, and in spirit contentious."

There is speculation, but no proof as yet, that the first wife of the Rev. Joseph Hull, Joanna, was

 


Joanna Coffin, probably related to the family of Tristram Coffin, one of the founders of Nantucket Island. The fact that one of their children was named Tristram might seem to bear this out. It is hoped that future genealogists may be able to clarify this matter.

Captain Tristram Hull, father of Mary Hull, the wife of Joseph Holley, Jr., was born possibly in Northleigh, Devonshire, England, about 1624. He was eleven years old when he came with his father and family, with the Hull Company, in 1635. He served in the military under Miles Standish.

Capt. Tristram Hull owned a ship, The Catch, and was part owner of the bark, Hopewell, and frequently made long sea voyages. He was engaged to a considerable extent in trade with the West Indies.

When on shore, he took a lively interest in local affairs in Barnstable, serving on juries, as a selectman, being on committees, etc. In the government's fanatical persecution of the Quakaers, his sympathies were with the Quakers and he helped them whenever possible. For this, he was subjected to much annoyance and heavy fines. Several of his children and many of his descendants were Quakers.

Capt. Tristram Hull died at Barnstable in 1667. He and his wife Blanche had six children, one of whom died in infancy. Their daughter Mary Hull, our ancestor, was their oldest.

We do not know Blanche's surname. A short time after Capt. Hull's death, his widow Blanche was married to Capt. William Hedge, who was old enough to be her father and from whom she soon separated. Blanche is frequently mentioned in the records as a woman whose reputation was not creditable to herself, her family, or her friends. The record says that "the change in her residence (upon her marriage to Hedge) did not improve her manners. Capt. Hedge cut her off with a shilling in his will, full eleven pence more than she deserved."

At the time Mary Hull's brother, Joseph Hull, Jr., married Experience Harper, the magistrates of Massachusetts undertook, without due process oflaw, to release the bond-servants and cancel articles of apprenticeship of those whose masters were Quakers. Joseph Hull, Jr. soundly thrashed one sheriff who was executing such illegal orders. He was fined £7 for this, though for some unstated reason, this was abated at the next session of court.

Experience Harper's father, Robert Harper, was a prominent Quaker in Boston. In 1660 he stood under the scaffold and cuaght the body of his friend, the Quaker preacher, william Leddra, when the hangman cut it down. For this, Robert Harper and his wife were banished (from Mass. Bay Colony).

                Soon after Joseph Hull's tangle with the sheriff, he sold his land in Barnstable and moved to South

Kingston, Rhode Island, a more hospitable climate for Quakers and other dissenters.

An interesting story about another one of Mary Hull's brothers, Capt. John Hull, took place during the early part of the war between England and France, in 1689, and concerned his connection with Admiral Sir Charles Wager, who was buried at Westminster Abbey in 1743.

                Charles Wager's stepfather was a London merchant and Quaker. The young Charles was apprenticed

to Capt. John Hull, and at the time of this incident, must have risen to the position of mate.

Capt. John Hull was sailing his merchant ship on the British Channel when a French privateer came in sight, and being the better sailer, it rapidly gained on the merchantman. Escape was hopeless. Capt. Hull was a Quaker whose principles would not allow him to fight. However, resistance on his part to a heavily armed ship would have been foolhardy. Not wanting to see his ship surrendered, Capt. Hull turned over the command to young Charles Wagner and went sadly below deck. Capt. Hull paced the cabin restlessly, and finally, unable to stand the suspense any longer, returned to the deck just as the Frenchman was crossing the bow, her decks crowded with men, and her captain calling on them to haul down their flag in token of surrender. Hull saw the opportunity at a glance and said to WAger, who was at the tiller, "Charles, if thee puts the helm a little more to starboard, thee will run that ship down."

Wager did so and they struck the privateer amidships, cutting her down, so that she sank with all aboard. Capt. Hull got his ship about as soon as possible to try to rescue some of the unfortunate crew, but the strong wind and heavy sea prevented this.

When he arrived in England, there was great rejoicing over the news of the destruction of the privateer, as she had done very serious damage to British shipping. The admiralty sent for Capt. Hull and

 


offered him a captaincy in the Roayl Navy, which he declined, saying that his principles would not allow him to accept itl nor could he take any reward for an action which was not without regret, insasmuch as so many fellow men had been sent to another world unprepared.

He added, however, that if they wished to reward someone, they could send for WAger of whom he spoke in high terms. The Admiralty did this, and gave Wager a midshipman's berth in the British Navy, from which position he rose rapidly by his own merit to eventually become Admiral, First Commissioner of the Admiralty, and Privy Councillor.

All his life, the Admiral was grateful to his old master, Capt. John Hull. Every year he sent to Capt. Hull on his birthday, a cask of wine and some of his letters accompanying the gift are said to still be in possession of Hull's family. Many years later, when Capt. Hull had retired, Admiral Charles Wager returned to Newport and was delighted to see his old commander, whom he presented to one of his officers in these words, "This, Sir, is Mr. Hull, my honored Master."

So you can see that we have a most interesting heritage in the families of our foremother, Hopestill Holley Worden. I have told you a bit about the Holley, Allen and Hull families. Further research may prove the Coffin connection and, if so, that could be another talk, as thre is so much information on the Coffin family.

 

We do not yet know the name of George Allen's first wife, mother of Rose Allen and grandmother of Hopestill Holley Worden. Nor do we know the last name of Blanche, wife of Capt. Tristram Hull and mother of Mary Hull Holley. Another family to be explored is that of Pes on or Pysing. Joan Peson was the Rev. Joseph Hull's mother. Her ancestry has been traced back to her grandfather, John Pysing, and his wife, Elizabeth Salmon, in the early 1500s.

 

References

Col. Weygant, comp., The Hull Family in America (The Hull Family Association [1914]). Milton Rubicam, Ahnentafel of Rubican Family of Green Meadows, MD (NEHGS [1954]), Amos Otis, Genealogical Notes of Barnstable Families [1890], revised by CF. Swift, VOL The Early History of Weymouth (Weymouth Historical Society), Vol. I, p. n.

NEHG Register Uanuary 1871], p. 13; [April 1877], p. 167.

 

typescript. II.

 


JOSEPH HOLLEY, SR. _ The Immigrant

 

b. prob. ca. 1605 West Anglia, England d. Dec 1647 Sandwich, Mass.

m. ca. 1628 Weymouth, England

 

Rose Allen b. ca. 1610

 

Rose was probably the daughter of George Allen, who came with Rev. Joseph Hull's Company to New England in 1635.

 

Rose's family and that of her second husband, William Newland, were Quakers. They were often fined, punished and imprisoned for their beliefs, and William was among them. (McFarlane)

 

Joseph died at age 38, leaving a son, Joseph, Jr., who was "of age," and four small daughters. (McFarlane)

 

The name was also spelled Holway, as well as other spellings.

 

1636

 

Joseph was in Saugus, now Lynn, Mass. (McFarlane)

 

1637

 

Joseph was by now in Sandwich, Mass. on Cape Cod. He was one of the sixty-one original settlers of Sandwich and one of sixteen long-term settlers. (McFarlane)

 

1645

 

Joseph's estate was finally settled, when all the daughters were grown.

 

19May1648

 

Rose married 2) William Newland, who had been appointed administrator of Joseph's estate. William assumed guardianship of the four underage daughters, but not of Joseph Holley, Jr. (McFarlane)

 

William was imprisoned and fined many times for practicing the Quaker religion.

 

Sources

Bowden, James, The History of the Society of Friends in America, [1850], Vol. I,

Records of Carol Robinson Casey.

Clark, Bertha, Sandwich Archives & Historical Center, MS, Sandwich, MA, [1955].

Genealogical Magazine of N.j., Uan. 1941], Vol. 16, No.1, pp. 1-5.

Jones, Rufus, The Quakers in the American Colonies.

Mayflower Descendants, Vol. 14, p. 167; Vol. 16, p. 60; Vol. 18, p. 137.

McFarlane, Sally, "Hopes till Holley and the Related Families of Holley, Allen and Hull," Worden's Past family association newsletter, Vol. XI, No.2, [Aug. 1990].

NEHG Register, Vol. 46, p. 186; Vol. 97, p. 330.

Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 4, p. 88.

Records of Kenneth Roebuck, Wakefield, R.I.

Sandwich Quaker Records.

Records of Marjorie Schunke.

Vital Records of Sandwich, Mass.

 

pp. 145- n.

 


GEORGE ALLEN

 

d. Spring 1649 Sandwich, Barnstable, Mass. m. 1) ---n

 

Among the first settlers at Sandwich, Mass. on Cape Cod, and the family were early converts to the Quaker faith. Many were fined and imprisoned for their beliefs.

 

George was an Anabaptist, a sect originating in Zurich, Switzerland in 1523, which rejected infant baptism and advocated separation of church and state.

 

George came from Somerset, England. He was married twice and had fourteen children, six by his first wife whose name is unknown and who died in England. Rose was his eldest child from this marriage. He married 2) Katherine, who came with him to America and with whom he had eight children.

 

Three of his sons from his first marriage were:

 

Ralph William Matthew

 

20Mar 1636

 

The Allen family sailed from England with Rev. Joseph Hull and his congregation from Weymouth, England.

 

By 1637

 

Living at Sandwich, Mass. on Cape Cod.

 

3Spetl639

 

Admitted as freeman.

 

1640

 

Was Surveyor of Highways.

 

1640's

 

Served as Deputy to the New Plymouth Court.

 

1657

 

His son Ralph converted to the Quaker faith.

 

1658

 

Son Ralph was deprived of his vote in the town meeting because of his faith.

 

This year, Quakers suffered increasing detention of goods and were prevented from holding religious meetings. They were fined because of their conscientious refusal to take the oath of fidelity, which was purposely used to try to catch them, and also fined because they did not attend local public worship. At the end of 1658, sixteen Friends were summoned to court at Plymouth and fined £5 each for refusing to take the oath. Some had already been fined previously on the same charge. Speaking of this persecution, the sufferers remarked that it was "contrary to the law of Christ, whose law is so strongly written in our hearts, and the keeping of it so delightsome to us, and the gloriousness of its life daily appearing, makes us to endure the cross patiently, and suffer the spoiling of our goods with joy."

 

1659

 

In 1658 and 1659 son Ralph had £68 in goods taken from him for refusing to swear to oaths and for attending a Friends Meeting.

 


1660

 

When Governor Endicott's persecution, torture and hanging of Quakers reached its peak, King Charles' restoration took place in England. The local authorities had been confident that Cromwell would not punish them for their excesses against Quakerism and had therefore dared to run counter to British law. Now, with the Restoration, they were unsure of their power and concerned that the law might go after them. 27 Friends imprisoned in Boston were released, among them the brothers William and Ralph Allen.

 

1661

 

Ralph was jailed in Boston for being a Quaker.

 

Note:                      Ralph and William were called to serve on the jury but refused to take the

oath. They were arraigned for having "disorderly" meetings at their houses. Actually, Quakers met in homes and had silent meetings, awaiting God. This kind of assembly was viewed as a grave offense and each were fined 20 shillings with an order that they should find sureties (bonds) in the sum of £80 for their good behavior in the following six months. If

they agreed to this, it would imply acknowledgement of the offense and agreement to stop Quaker worship, so they refused to comply. They were jailed for five months. After two and a half months in jail they were offered freedom if they agreed not to receive or listen to a Quaker, but they refused to do this.

 

Ralph and six siblings continued their Quaker meetings. They were singled out by local ministers and magistrates, and were the only individuals required to take an "oath of fidelity."

 

20ctl661

 

Rose Allen and her 2nd husband, William Newland, were fined 10 shillings for being at a Quaker meeting. The same year, William was complained of for having entertained a Quaker in his home.

 

1678

 

Four prominent Friends, including William Allen and Nathaniel Fitzrandall (Hopestill Holley Worden's brother-in-law), petitioned the General Court of Plymouth, giving their reasons why they could not in good faith contribute to the mandatory support of the established preachers. Almost fifty years later, King George I finally declared himself in no uncertain terms and the end came to persecution for refusal to pay church rates.

 

Sources

Bowden, James, The History of the Society of Friends in America, [1850], Vol. I, pp. 145- u.

Records of Carol Robinson Casey.

Clark, Bertha, Sand'Wich Archives & Historical Center, MS, Sandwich, MA, [1955]

Genealogical Magazine ofN.]., Uan. 1941], Vol. 16, No.1, pp. 1-5.

Jones, Rufus, The Quakers in the American Colonies.

Mayflower Descendants, Vol. 14, p. 167; Vol. 16, p. 60; Vol. 18, p. 137.

McFarlane, Sally, "Hopes till Holley and the Related Families of Holley, Allen and Hull," Worden's Past family

association newsletter, Vol. XI, No.2, [Aug. 1990].

NEHG Register, Vol. 46, p. 186; Vol. 97, p. 330.

Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 4, p. 88.

Records of Kenneth Roebuck, Wakefield, R.I.

Sandwich Quaker Records.

Records of Marjorie Schunke.

Vital Records of Sandwich, Mass.

 


HOLLEY - HULL-ALLEN -WORDEN INTERMARRIAGES

 

This chart is meant to help the reader understand the c_mplicated intermarriages between these families, usually first cousin to first cousin.

 

Tohn Pvsing m. Elizabeth Salmon     before 1551

 

Peter Worden I 1568-69 - 1638-39

 

Richard Hull m. Alice Richard Peson m. Margery

       1559 1558

                                                  Peter Worden II m. Mary Sears (?)

 

Thomas Hull ca. 1550-1636

 

m.

 

Ioane Peson

 

prob.lohn Allen

 

Rev. Toseph Hull m. 1) ToannaCoffin (?) 1596-1665        - 1632

 

George Allen 1581-3 - 1648

 

T ristam Hull m. Blanche ca. 1624 - ca. 1666

 

Toseph Hollev Sr. m. Rose Allen ca.1605-1647 ca. 1610-1690-94

 

Marv Hull m. Toseph Hollev. Tr. Hopestill Hollev m. Dr. Samuel Worden             1645-1692     1636-1692     1646 - 1715            1646 - 1716

 

Mary Hollev m. Peter Worden III I Tohn Hollev m. Hopestill Worden -1732            1665-1733               I 1667-68 -1745

 

Rose Hollev m. Samuel Worden II    ca.1673-1740 1670-1727

 

Peter Worden, above, who m. Mary Holley, son of Hopestill Holley and Dr. Samuel Worden

 

Hopestill Worden. above, who married John Holley, daughter of Hopestill Holley and Dr. Samuel Worden

 

Samuel Worden II, above, who married Rose Holley, son of Hopestill Holley and Dr. Samuel Worden

 

Continuing from above:

 

Peter Worden III m. Marv Hollev Hopestill Worden m. Tohn Hollev 1668 -1732   1665 -1733        1667-68 -1745

 

Peter Worden IV m. Rebecca Richmond Tohn Hollev 1688 -      1720 - 1745

 

Elizabeth Worden m. Toseph Petty 1721 - 1724 ­

 

Dorcas Petty m. Toseph Hollev

 


Samuel Worden II m. Rose Hollev 1670 - 1727 ca. 1673 - 1740

 

James Worden m. Thankful Hollev Thankful was sister ofJohn Holley, above,

1702 - 1794                                                            and daughter of John Holley and Hopestill

Worden

 

Joseph Worden m. Rachel Grant His sister Hopestill Worden m. David Tanner 1742 -   1737­

 

Hannah Worden m. Hollev Tanner - 1857           1772- 1848

 


v.

 

DR. SAMUEL WORDEN

B. ca. 1646, East Dennis, Barnstable, MA; d. 26 A4g 1716, Stonington, New London, cf; bur. Wequetequoc Cemetery; m. 1) bef. May 1665, Yarmouth, Hopestill Holley, b.1645-46, Sandwich, Barnstable, MA; d. 13 Sep 1715, Stonington, New London, cf; and he m. 2) Frances West.

                Hopestill Holley was the daughter ofJoseph Holley, Sr. and his wife, Rose Allen. Rose was

the daughter of George Allen, d. 1649, Sandwich, Barnstable, MA. Rose m. 2) William Newland.

M. 2) Frances West. Some sources say 1693, but that is doubtful, unless he divorced Hopestill, who d. 1715. Divorce was rare, but did occur in the 17th century. May have been b. at Yarmouth on Cape Cod (McCann).

The Holley and Worden families intermarried for at least five generations. Three of Hopestill and Samuel's children married first cousins, the children of Hopestill Holley Worden's brother, Joseph Holley, Jr., and Mary Hull, his wife:

Mary Holley married Peter Worden III

John Holley married Hopestill Worden

Rose Holley married Samuel Worden II (McFarlane)

 

1660-90

 

1690

 

1716

 

18Septl716

 

Learned the profession of medicine on Cape Cod. He was probably an apprentice around age 15, ca. 1660, until about 1665, when he married Hopestill. Ifhe simply "read for medicine," it would have been later, around 1670-90. His name does not appear in the personal records of a Cape Cod physician, so he probably read for medicine with a doctor, in which case his name would not appear. Early doctors tended not to have university degrees. Doctoring was a trade in the seventeenth century, on the same level as barber, carpenter, blacksmith, printer or cooper. Often doctors were also ministers, seeing healing as part of their positions (Christ healing the ill). These were called clerical physicians. Others were barber -physicians, apothecaries, midwives, or folk practitioners. Apothecaries often lived on the proceeds of the drugs they sold, as physicians often needed independent means, since they usually were not paid. (McCann)

 

After the deaths of his parents he, bought land in Rhode Island.

 

Widow relinquished her right to administer estate. The same was granted to a son, Isaac.

 

The widow Frances remarried.

 

Early Medicine in Colonial America

In the 1700s in Europe more than 60 million died of smallpox. In the early years in America smallpox took thousands oflives.

The first smallpox vaccination was done by Edward Jenner in 1796. A professor at Harvard University introduced it to America in 1800 when he used it on his own son.

The first simple microscope was made in 1650 but not perfected until the 1800's.

 

1646 English Civil War ends with the surrender of Oxford to the Roundheads; Parliamentary commissioners present Charles I with the Newcasde Propositions, demanding religious reforms and surrender of control of armed forces for 20 years. The king tries to escape but his plan fails; First lime trees are planted betWeen Royal Palace and Zoological Gardens in Berlin; German mathematician Athanasius Kircher constructs the first projection lantern (Iaterna magica).

 

Children of George Allen and his wife, name unknown:

 


1. 2. 3. 4.

 

Rose Allen, m. Joseph Holley, Sr. Ralph Allen.

William Allen.

Matthew Allen.

 

Children of Joseph and Rose (Allen) Holley. Sr.:

1.             Joseph Holley, Jr., b.England; d.1692; m.1 May 1657, Sandwich, Barnstable,MA,

Mary Hull, b. 6 Feb 1645; d. bef. 1692. She was probably the daughter of Capt. Tristam Hull and his wife, Blanche ( ).

Mary Holley, d. 12 Jul1703, Woodbridge, Middlesex, NJ; m. Noy 1662, Sandwich, Barnstable, MA, Nathaniel FitzRandolphlFitzRandall.

Sarah Holley, d. 1575-80, m. Joseph Allen. Joseph was her first cousin, the son of Ralph Allen and grandson of George Allen. He m. 2) Sarah Hull, probably the daughter of Capt. T ristam and Blanche Hull.

Hopestill Holley, b. 1645-46, Sandwich, Barnstable, MA; d. 13 Sep 1715, Stonington, New London, Ct; m. bef. May 1665, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA., Dr. Samuel Worden, b. ca. 1646, East Dennis, Barnstable, MA; d. 26 Aug 1716, Stoning ton, New London, CT; bur. Wequetequoc Cemetery.

Experience Holley, m. 9 Jan 1668, John Goodspeed of Barnstable, MA.

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5.

 

Children of Rose Allen and William Newland:

1.         Mercy Newland, b. 16 Apr 1649; m. William Edwards.

2.         Rose Newland, m. Joseph Buch.

3.         Elizabeth Newland, d. 4 Sep 1658.

 

Children of Dr. Samuel and Hopestill (Holley) Worden:

1.             Peter Worden ill, b. 1668, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA; d. 18 Noy 1732, Warwick, Kent, RI;

m. 20 Feb 1693, Mary Holley, b. 16 Feb 1665, Sandwich, Barnstable, MA; d. 1733, Warwick, Kent, RI.

Samuel Worden II, b. ca. 1670, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA; d.2 Sep 1727; m. 1697 -98, Rose Holley, b. ca. 1673; d. 1740.

Dr. Isaac Worden, b. 1673, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA; d. 1718; m. 1695, Rebekah ( ). Dr. Thomas Worden, b. 1675, Barnstable Co., MA; d. 1 Jun 1759; m. 9 Dec 1708, Sarah Butler.

Dr. Nathaniel Worden, b. ca. 1679, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA; d. 1738; m. 1706-07, Margaret ( ).

Mary Worden, b. ca. 1680; d. bef. 1728; m. 1697, Daniel Wilcox.

Hopestill Worden, m. John Holloway.

Rose Worden, m. Richard Partelow, Jr.

 

2.

 

3. 4.

 

5.

 

6. 7. 8.

 

Sources

Bell, Whitfield, Jr., "A Portrait of the Colonial Physician," Bulletin of the History of

 

Medicine, 44, [Noy/Dec 1970].

 

Byrne, JohnJ., M.D., 1970, Boston, MA.

Duffy, John, The Healers, McGraw Hill.

Ipson, Ruth, records of.

Kaufman, Martin, American Medical Education - The Formative Years 1765-1920, G r e e n woo d Pre s s , [1976].

 


MacFarlane, Sally, "Hopes till Holley Worden and the Related Families of Holley, Allen and Hull," Worden's Past family association newsletter, Vol. XI, No.2.

McCann, Clara Worden, "Dr. Samuel Worden and Early Medicine in Colonial America," Worden's Past family association newsletter, Vol. XI, No.4.

Miller, Genevieve, "The Medical Apprenticeship in the America Colonies," Ciba Symposia, [8 Jan 1947]. Norwood, William Frederick, Medical Education in the United States Before the Civil War, University of Pennsylvania Press, [1944].

Packard, Francis R., The History of Medicine in the United States.

Rothstein, William G., American Medical Schools and the Practice of Medicine, Oxford University Press, [1987]. Records of Marjorie Schunke.

Records of Patricia C. Worden.

Worden's Past family association newsletter, Vol. XI, No.2, [Aug. 1990] -intermarriages between Holley, Hull, Allen and Worden families.

 


Vll.

 

PETER WORDEN IV

B.1697,RI; d.1745, Westerly, Washington, RI; m. 26 May 1720, Westerly, Rebecca Richmond, b. 23 May 1689, Kingston, Wakefield, RI. She was the daughter ofJohn and Elizabeth ( ) Richmond.

 

1697 Peter the Great, calling himself Peter Michailoff, sets out on a 1 Y2 year journey to Prussia, Holland, England and Vienna to study European ways of life; Last remains of Maya civilization destroyed by Spanish in Yucatan; Sedan chair becomes a popular means of transportation.

 

Children:

1.             Elizabeth Worden, b.29Marl721, Westerly, Washington,RI; m.1756-57, Westerly, Joseph

Petty.

Gideon Worden, b. 22 Dec 1722, Westerly, Washington, RI; m. 1 May 1748, Portsmouth, Newport, RI, Rebekah Brown.

John Worden, b. ca. 1724, Westerly, Washington, RI; d. 1779, Charles town, Washington, RI; m.1 May 1746, Westerly, Dorothy Saterlee/Satterlee, b. 1724, Westerly, Washington, RI; d. 1767, Richmond, RI. She was the daughter of John Saterlee/Satterlee and his wife, Experience Lamphere. John m. 2) 1 Jan 1769, Susannah Babcock, at Richmond, RI.

Content/Constant Worden, b.1725-26, Westerly, Washington, RI; m.ll Aug 1752,James Hadsall.

Mary Ann Worden, b. ca. 1726; m. 1751, John Babcock.

Elder Peter Worden V, b. 6 Jun 1728, Westerly, Washington, RI; d. 21 Feb 1808, Cheshire, Berkshire, MA; bur. Jenks Cemetery, Cheshire.

Sylvester Worden, b. ca. 1732, Westerly, Washington, RI; d. 30 Apr 1814, Halifax, Windham, VT; bur. Worden Family Cemetery, Halifax; m. ca. 1757, Rebecca Eggleston. Rebecca Worden, m. 18 Jan 1748, Dartmouth, New Bedford, MA, John Babcock.

Elisha Worden I, b. ca. 1742; d. 17 Sep 1820, Halifax, Windham, VT; bur. Worden Family C.:emetery, Halifax; m.1) Thankful ( ), and 2) 23 Oct 1787, Monson, Hampden, MA,Lucy Slate.

Ruth Worden, b. Westerly, Washington, RI; m. Daniel Dodge.

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5. 6.

 

7.

 

8. 9.

 

10.

 


VllI.

 

JOHN WORDEN

B. ca. 1724, Westerly, Washington, RI; d. 1779, Charles town, Washington, RI; m. 1 May 1746, Westerly, Dorothy Saterlee/Satterlee, b. 1724, Westerly, Washington, RI; d. 1767, Richmond, RI. She was the daughter ofJohn Saterlee/Satterlee and his wife, Experience Lamphere. John m. 2) 1 Jan 1769, Richmond, RI, Susannah Babcock.

 

10Junl746

 

Received 150 acres ofland from brother Gideon in Charles town, Washington, RI. Recorded this date.

 

1723 Voltaire writes a history, "La Henriade"; Sir Christopher Wren, the English architect, dies; ].S. Bach composes "St. John Passion"; Bach is appointed thomascantor in Leipzig, after T elemarm refuses the post; Handel writes an opera, "Onone," in London; Duty on tea reduced by Sir Robert Walpole; 1724 Gin drinking becomes popular in Great Britain; Jack Sheppard, English highwayman, is executed.

 

Children with Dorothy:

1.             Deacon John Worden II, b. ca. 1747, Westerly, Washington, RI; d. 2 Sep 1802, South

Kingston, Wakefield, RI; m. 12 Nov 1769, Westerly, Elizabeth Babcock.

Nathan Worden, b.1749, Westerly, Washington,RI; d.l0Jan 1804, Chesterfield, Cheshire, NH; m. 1778, Amy Waters.

Joseph Worden, b.1753, Westerly, Washington, RI; d. ca. 1817-19, Jefferson Co., NY; m. 1) 1776, Halifax, Windham, VT, Electa Lamb, b. ca. 1756; d.1836. She was a widow. Some sources say her first name was Amy.

Wait Worden, b. ca. 1763.

Hannah Worden, b. 26 Jun 1761, Westerly, Washington, RI; d. 7 JulI822, Dummerston, Windham, VT; m. 10 Nov 1782, Dummerston, Major William Miller. [This child is not proven. ]

 

2.

 

3.

 

4. 5.

 

Children with Susannah:

1.         Peter Worden, b. ca. 1772. [This child is not proven.]

2.         Gideon Worden, b. ca. 1774. [Thischild is not proven.]

 

Sources

Records of Donna L. Benedict.

Records of Patricia C. Worden.

Hemerway, Vermont Gazetteer, Vol. V, p. 165.

 

Satterlee Moffat-Fowler, Goldie, Satterlee and Allied Families, [1970], pp. 85-87. Worden's Past family association newsletter.

 


IX.

 

JOSEPH WORDEN

B. 1753, Westerly, Washington, RI; d. ca. 1817-19, Jefferson Co., NY; m. 1) 1776, Halifax, Windham, VT, Electa Lamb, b.ca.1756; d.1836. She was a widow. Some sources say her first name was Amy.

Bought farm from Morgan Starks and resided there until death in 1817, in Jefferson Co., NY.

 

1776

 

M. 1) Electa Lamb at Halifax, Windham, VT (widowed)

 

1781

 

Massacre of 1781 in Groton, cr caused family to move to Halifax, Windham, VT.

 

1803

 

In Rutland, NY by this date.

 

1807

 

Opened a public house (bar or inn) by this date, eventually sold out to Elisha Clark.

 

1753 French troops horn Canada seize {he Ohio Valley; James McHenry, u.S. Secretary of War, is bom; English Act of Parliament grants naturalization of Jews; British Marriage Act forbids weddings by unauthorized persons.

 

Children:

1.             Thomas Worden, b. ca. 1778; d. ca. 1817-18. No children.

2.             Amos Prentiss Worden, b. 5 Sep 1780, Groton, New London, cr; d. 2 Ju11841, Grafton,

Lorane, OH; m.MaryCase, b. 22 May 1795, Camden, Oneida, NY; d.11Jan 1848, Grafton, Lorane, OH.

John Worden, b. ca. 1782-87, Halifax, Windham, VT; d. 1870-72, Adams Co., WI; m. Catherine Starke. Living in 1866 in Coldwater, Branch, MI. His marriage is unconfirmed. Joseph Worden, b. ca. 1787-89, VT; d.15 Jun 1877; bur. Black River, Jefferson, NY; m. Leafy ( ). He was living in 1868 in Black River, Jefferson, NY.

Hannah Worden, b. ca. 1789; d. 1799-1800, Halifax, Windham, VT. Unmarried. Nathan Worden, b. ca. 1794; d. 1814, Troy, Rensselaer, NY.

Ezra Worden, b. 1795-96; d.5 Nov 1879; bur. Black River, Jefferson, NY; m. Rachel Starks. Living in 1868 in Felt Mills, Jefferson, NY.

Jesse Worden, b. 1798, Halifax, Windham, VT; d. 1833, Gouverneur or Heman, St. Lawrence, NY; m. Judith Gotham.

Avery Worden, b. ca. 1799; d. 26 Feb 1810.

Avery does not appear on any Census. He froze to death per the records of Donna L. Benedict. In the Gazeteer ofJefferson Co., NY, appeared this notice: "An event in the early history of the town, which caused much sympathy, was the death of Avery Worden on Feb. 26,

1810. Ezra and his brother, Avery, age 12, started for home at 6:00 p.m., through 5 feet of snow. Avery froze to death. Ezra went for help but the rescue party did not make it back in time."

Electa Worden, b. ca. 1801; d. ca. 1843. Per the records of Donna L. Benedict, Electa was a male, married, and had eight children, moving to Jefferson Co., NY in 1802. She notes the Boston Transcript, 6 Apr 1934 [see ONW-137].

 

3.

 

4.

 

5. 6. 7.

 

8.

 

9.

 

10.

 

Sources

Records of Donna L. Benedict.

Child, Hamilton, Gazetteer of Jefferson Co., NY, [1890], p. 665.

History of Groton, CT, p. 266.

History of Rutland, p. 664.

Satterlee Moffatt-Fowler, Goldie, Satterlee/Satterley/ /Satterly and Allied Families, [1972], p. 4 (shows Joseph had 10 children).

 


Records of Patricia C. Worden.

U.S. Census, Vermont (Halifax, Windham Co.), 1790. U.S. Census, New York, (Rutland, Jefferson Co.), 1810. Worden's Past family association newsletter.

 


x.

 

AMOS PRENTISS WORDEN

B.5 Sep 1780, Groton, New London, cT; d. 2Jul1841, Grafton, Lorane, OH; m. Mary Case, b. 22 May 1795, Camden, Oneida, NY; d. 11 Jan 1848, Grafton, Lorane, OH. This family converted to the early LDS Church.

First wife's name is unknown; two children from this marriage. (Records of Donna Benedict) Donna Benedict also says he was b. 1776, d. 1842 at Lorane Co., OH. Had a large family,

not named in Worden Family supplement.

                [Some records say that Mary was b. 15 May 1796; d. fan 1840, Grafton.]

Mary was the daughter of Oliver Case and his wife, Isabel/lsabella Rockwood.

 

1780 American Revolution: Charleston, SC sUITenders to British; French troops arrive at Newport, RI; Americans defeated at Camden; British army defeated at King's Mountain, NC; Benedict Arnold's plot to sUITender West Point is revealed. Pitt the Younger enters Parliament; Spanish dance, Bolero, is invented by dancer Sebastiano Careza; Sebastien Erard in Paris makes the first modem pianoforte; Circular saw invented by Gervinus; Scheller constructs the first fountain pen.

 

Children of Oliver and Isabel/Isabella (Rockwood) Case:

1.         Mary Case, b.22 May 1795,Camden, Oneida, NY,d. 11 Jan 1848, Grafton,Lorane,

OH; m. Amos Prentiss Worden.

Joel Worden, b. 1796; m. Fannie ( ).

Amos Parley Worden, b. 1797; m. Margaret Lidoria Boyer.

 

2. 3.

 

Children of Amos Prentiss and Mary (Case) Worden:

1.             John Henry Worden, b. ca. 1818, Antwerp, Jefferson, NY.

2.             Isabel Worden, b. ca. 1820, Antwerp, Jefferson, NY.

3.             Joanna Case Worden, b. 17 Feb 1822, Antwerp, Jefferson, NY; d. 5 May 1902, Vernal,

Unitah, UT; m. 26 Mar 1838, Elisha Barrus Keyes, b. 28 Mar 1806, Chenango Co., NY; d. 27 Sep 1855. [For a continuation of this line, see the Keyes line, VIIl. Elisha Barrus Keyes]

 

4.

 

Maryetta Livisa Worden, b.30 Mar 1824, Latay, Jefferson, NY; d. 3 Jun 1878-79, Snowflake, Navajo, AZ; m. twice - on 24 Jan 1848, Albert Pease, and Thomas Coordan of Dekalb, IL. Her name may have been Marietta Calista.

Nathaniel Prentiss Worden, b. 9 Apr 1826, Rutland, Jefferson, NY; d. 27 Feb 1907, Pima, Graham, AZ; m. 1) 19 Jan 1846, Nauvoo, Hancock, IL, Ann Cowley; m. 2) Nancy McFata; m. 3) 2 Feb 1852, Bountiful, UT Harriett Elvira Teeples Sessions; m. 4) Marry Butterfield. He was a polygamist, and had 21 _hildren.

Hannah Livisa Worden, b. 11 Nov 1827-29, Rutland, Jefferson, NY; d. 22 Dec 1845 at age 16, Grafton, Lorane, OH. She may have been Hanna Louisa/Lovisa.

Anson Miller Worden, b. 26 May 1834-35, Rutland, Jefferson, NY; d. 3 Jul1845, Nauvoo, Hancock, IL.

Benjamin Franklin Worden, b. 22 Feb 1836-37, Grafton, Lorane, OH; d. 3 Jul1908, La Harpe, Hancock, IL; bur. La Harpe Cemetery.

9. Mary E. Worden. Removed to Provo, UT in 1860.

 

5.

 

6.

 

7.

 

8.

 

9.

 

Sources

Records of Donna L. Benedict.

Records of Olive Hildreth.

Records of Rex Warden.

Records of Patricia C. Worden.

u.s. Census, New York, (Rutland, Jefferson Co.) 1810,1820,1830.

 


U.S. Census, New York, (Antwerp, Jefferson Co.) 1820, 1830. u.S. Census, Ohio, (Ridge field, Lorane Co.) 1850.

u.S. Census, Illinois (Nauvoo, Hancock Co.), 1850. Worden's Past family association newsletter